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Male Sexual Behavior and Pheromone Emission Is Enhanced by Exposure to Guava Fruit Volatiles in Anastrepha fraterculus.

Bachmann GE, Segura DF, Devescovi F, Juárez ML, Ruiz MJ, Vera MT, Cladera JL, Teal PE, Fernández PC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Changes in male behavior appear to be particularly important during the initial phase of the sexual activity period, when most of the mating pairs are formed.This finding has important implications for the management of this pest species through the Sterile Insect Technique.We discuss the possibility of using artificial blends to improve the sexual competitiveness of sterile males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Genética "E.A. Favret", Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA), Hurlingham, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Background: Plant chemicals can affect reproductive strategies of tephritid fruit flies by influencing sex pheromone communication and increasing male mating competitiveness.

Objective and methodology: We explored whether exposure of Anastrepha fraterculus males to guava fruit volatiles and to a synthetic blend of volatile compounds released by this fruit affects the sexual performance of wild and laboratory flies. By means of bioassays and pheromone collection we investigated the mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

Results: Guava volatile exposure enhanced male mating success and positively affected male calling behavior and pheromone release in laboratory and wild males. Changes in male behavior appear to be particularly important during the initial phase of the sexual activity period, when most of the mating pairs are formed. Exposure of laboratory males to a subset of guava fruit volatiles enhanced mating success, showing that the response to the fruit might be mimicked artificially.

Conclusions: Volatiles of guava seem to influence male mating success through an enhancement of chemical and physical signals related to the communication between sexes. This finding has important implications for the management of this pest species through the Sterile Insect Technique. We discuss the possibility of using artificial blends to improve the sexual competitiveness of sterile males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal pattern of the different components of Anastrepha fraterculus wild male´s sexual behavior.a) Number of males fanning their wings along the 210 minutes of observation time (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.223 for wing fanning). b) Number of males exposing their salivary gland (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.007 for salivary gland). c) Number of males exposing their anal pouch (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.080 for anal pouch). d) Sexual displays which results from adding the three recorded behavioral parameters (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.024 for sexual display). Mean values are presented separately in all male treatments. In all cases GLM showed significant differences at P<0.0001 for observation time and non-significant differences neither for mating status, nor for any interaction.
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pone.0124250.g003: Temporal pattern of the different components of Anastrepha fraterculus wild male´s sexual behavior.a) Number of males fanning their wings along the 210 minutes of observation time (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.223 for wing fanning). b) Number of males exposing their salivary gland (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.007 for salivary gland). c) Number of males exposing their anal pouch (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.080 for anal pouch). d) Sexual displays which results from adding the three recorded behavioral parameters (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.024 for sexual display). Mean values are presented separately in all male treatments. In all cases GLM showed significant differences at P<0.0001 for observation time and non-significant differences neither for mating status, nor for any interaction.

Mentions: Frequency of fanning, salivary gland exposure and anal pouch exposure were high early in the morning and diminished gradually over time (Fig 3). Accordingly, there was a highly significant effect of the observation time on the three recorded behaviors and their sum (i.e. sexual display) (Table 1). The highest rates of sexual display occurred early in the morning, which corresponds to the time of highest mating probability (see Fig 1B). Exposed males showed the highest mean values of the three behaviors analyzed during the first 60 minutes of observation, while the curve for non-exposed and non-mated males showed the lowest values. Salivary gland exposure (Fig 3B) and sexual display (Fig 3C) showed to be significant in guava-exposed males. Mating status showed to be non-significant in any case (Table 1). Given that most of copulations occurred early in the morning we did a two-way ANOVA only for the first observation period (i.e. first 30 minutes from the beginning of sexual activity) as a post hoc test. Results confirmed the occurrence of significant differences between exposed and non-exposed males for salivary gland exposure (F1,36 = 4.72, N = 40, P = 0.036) and extended this effect to wing fanning (F1,36 = 4.92, N = 40, P = 0.033). For sexual display and anal pouch the effect of guava exposure was not significant (F1,36 = 3.22, N = 40, P = 0.081 and F1,36 = 0.09, N = 40, P = 0.770 respectively). For the four response variables both, mating status and the interaction between exposure condition and mating status were non-significant (P>0.05).


Male Sexual Behavior and Pheromone Emission Is Enhanced by Exposure to Guava Fruit Volatiles in Anastrepha fraterculus.

Bachmann GE, Segura DF, Devescovi F, Juárez ML, Ruiz MJ, Vera MT, Cladera JL, Teal PE, Fernández PC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Temporal pattern of the different components of Anastrepha fraterculus wild male´s sexual behavior.a) Number of males fanning their wings along the 210 minutes of observation time (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.223 for wing fanning). b) Number of males exposing their salivary gland (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.007 for salivary gland). c) Number of males exposing their anal pouch (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.080 for anal pouch). d) Sexual displays which results from adding the three recorded behavioral parameters (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.024 for sexual display). Mean values are presented separately in all male treatments. In all cases GLM showed significant differences at P<0.0001 for observation time and non-significant differences neither for mating status, nor for any interaction.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414461&req=5

pone.0124250.g003: Temporal pattern of the different components of Anastrepha fraterculus wild male´s sexual behavior.a) Number of males fanning their wings along the 210 minutes of observation time (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.223 for wing fanning). b) Number of males exposing their salivary gland (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.007 for salivary gland). c) Number of males exposing their anal pouch (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.080 for anal pouch). d) Sexual displays which results from adding the three recorded behavioral parameters (mean ± SE) (GLM, P = 0.024 for sexual display). Mean values are presented separately in all male treatments. In all cases GLM showed significant differences at P<0.0001 for observation time and non-significant differences neither for mating status, nor for any interaction.
Mentions: Frequency of fanning, salivary gland exposure and anal pouch exposure were high early in the morning and diminished gradually over time (Fig 3). Accordingly, there was a highly significant effect of the observation time on the three recorded behaviors and their sum (i.e. sexual display) (Table 1). The highest rates of sexual display occurred early in the morning, which corresponds to the time of highest mating probability (see Fig 1B). Exposed males showed the highest mean values of the three behaviors analyzed during the first 60 minutes of observation, while the curve for non-exposed and non-mated males showed the lowest values. Salivary gland exposure (Fig 3B) and sexual display (Fig 3C) showed to be significant in guava-exposed males. Mating status showed to be non-significant in any case (Table 1). Given that most of copulations occurred early in the morning we did a two-way ANOVA only for the first observation period (i.e. first 30 minutes from the beginning of sexual activity) as a post hoc test. Results confirmed the occurrence of significant differences between exposed and non-exposed males for salivary gland exposure (F1,36 = 4.72, N = 40, P = 0.036) and extended this effect to wing fanning (F1,36 = 4.92, N = 40, P = 0.033). For sexual display and anal pouch the effect of guava exposure was not significant (F1,36 = 3.22, N = 40, P = 0.081 and F1,36 = 0.09, N = 40, P = 0.770 respectively). For the four response variables both, mating status and the interaction between exposure condition and mating status were non-significant (P>0.05).

Bottom Line: Changes in male behavior appear to be particularly important during the initial phase of the sexual activity period, when most of the mating pairs are formed.This finding has important implications for the management of this pest species through the Sterile Insect Technique.We discuss the possibility of using artificial blends to improve the sexual competitiveness of sterile males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Genética "E.A. Favret", Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA), Hurlingham, Argentina; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Background: Plant chemicals can affect reproductive strategies of tephritid fruit flies by influencing sex pheromone communication and increasing male mating competitiveness.

Objective and methodology: We explored whether exposure of Anastrepha fraterculus males to guava fruit volatiles and to a synthetic blend of volatile compounds released by this fruit affects the sexual performance of wild and laboratory flies. By means of bioassays and pheromone collection we investigated the mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

Results: Guava volatile exposure enhanced male mating success and positively affected male calling behavior and pheromone release in laboratory and wild males. Changes in male behavior appear to be particularly important during the initial phase of the sexual activity period, when most of the mating pairs are formed. Exposure of laboratory males to a subset of guava fruit volatiles enhanced mating success, showing that the response to the fruit might be mimicked artificially.

Conclusions: Volatiles of guava seem to influence male mating success through an enhancement of chemical and physical signals related to the communication between sexes. This finding has important implications for the management of this pest species through the Sterile Insect Technique. We discuss the possibility of using artificial blends to improve the sexual competitiveness of sterile males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus