Limits...
Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene.

Tsukahara K, Sawada H, Kohno Y, Matsuura T, Mori IC, Terao T, Ioki M, Tamaoki M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss.Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki.These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8506, Japan; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Genome scans for ozone-induced yield loss and the number of primary rachis branches.(A, C) QTL likelihood maps for (A) grain yield and (C) the number of primary rachis branches. Genetic maps were produced by composite interval mapping using differences between ambient air and elevated ozone. (B, D) Additive effect of (B) QTLs for grain yield and (D) the number of primary rachis branches. A positive (negative) additive effect in B and D represents an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Habataki). The vertical dotted lines separate chromosomes 1–12 (labeled at the bottom) progressing left to right along the x-axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414449&req=5

pone.0123308.g002: Genome scans for ozone-induced yield loss and the number of primary rachis branches.(A, C) QTL likelihood maps for (A) grain yield and (C) the number of primary rachis branches. Genetic maps were produced by composite interval mapping using differences between ambient air and elevated ozone. (B, D) Additive effect of (B) QTLs for grain yield and (D) the number of primary rachis branches. A positive (negative) additive effect in B and D represents an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Habataki). The vertical dotted lines separate chromosomes 1–12 (labeled at the bottom) progressing left to right along the x-axis.

Mentions: We performed QTL analyses for these traits in the CSSLs and found QTLs on chromosome 6 involved in ozone-induced reduction of grain yield and of the number of primary rachis branches (Fig 2A and 2C). The LOD score for grain yield was > 7 in 2009 (Fig 2A); although it was <3 in 2010, this value was still the largest among all chromosomes. The LOD score of the QTLs for the number of primary rachis branches was highest in 2010 (> 3), although it was not the highest (< 2) in 2009 (Fig 2C). The highest peak was detected at the end of short arm in chromosome 2 (Figs 2 and 3), but the additive effect of this QTL indicates an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Fig 2). The positions of the QTLs for grain yield and the number of primary rachis branches at the end of chromosome 6 were nearly identical (Fig 2). The negative additive effect of these QTLs indicates an increasing allele from Habataki (Fig 2B and 2D).


Ozone-Induced Rice Grain Yield Loss Is Triggered via a Change in Panicle Morphology That Is Controlled by ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 Gene.

Tsukahara K, Sawada H, Kohno Y, Matsuura T, Mori IC, Terao T, Ioki M, Tamaoki M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Genome scans for ozone-induced yield loss and the number of primary rachis branches.(A, C) QTL likelihood maps for (A) grain yield and (C) the number of primary rachis branches. Genetic maps were produced by composite interval mapping using differences between ambient air and elevated ozone. (B, D) Additive effect of (B) QTLs for grain yield and (D) the number of primary rachis branches. A positive (negative) additive effect in B and D represents an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Habataki). The vertical dotted lines separate chromosomes 1–12 (labeled at the bottom) progressing left to right along the x-axis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414449&req=5

pone.0123308.g002: Genome scans for ozone-induced yield loss and the number of primary rachis branches.(A, C) QTL likelihood maps for (A) grain yield and (C) the number of primary rachis branches. Genetic maps were produced by composite interval mapping using differences between ambient air and elevated ozone. (B, D) Additive effect of (B) QTLs for grain yield and (D) the number of primary rachis branches. A positive (negative) additive effect in B and D represents an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Habataki). The vertical dotted lines separate chromosomes 1–12 (labeled at the bottom) progressing left to right along the x-axis.
Mentions: We performed QTL analyses for these traits in the CSSLs and found QTLs on chromosome 6 involved in ozone-induced reduction of grain yield and of the number of primary rachis branches (Fig 2A and 2C). The LOD score for grain yield was > 7 in 2009 (Fig 2A); although it was <3 in 2010, this value was still the largest among all chromosomes. The LOD score of the QTLs for the number of primary rachis branches was highest in 2010 (> 3), although it was not the highest (< 2) in 2009 (Fig 2C). The highest peak was detected at the end of short arm in chromosome 2 (Figs 2 and 3), but the additive effect of this QTL indicates an increasing allele from Sasanishiki (Fig 2). The positions of the QTLs for grain yield and the number of primary rachis branches at the end of chromosome 6 were nearly identical (Fig 2). The negative additive effect of these QTLs indicates an increasing allele from Habataki (Fig 2B and 2D).

Bottom Line: The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss.Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki.These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8506, Japan; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Rice grain yield is predicted to decrease in the future because of an increase in tropospheric ozone concentration. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the responses to ozone of two rice (Oryza Sativa L.) cultivars, Sasanishiki and Habataki. Sasanishiki showed ozone-induced leaf injury, but no grain yield loss. By contrast, Habataki showed grain yield loss with minimal leaf injury. A QTL associated with grain yield loss caused by ozone was identified in Sasanishiki/Habataki chromosome segment substitution lines and included the ABERRANT PANICLE ORGANIZATION 1 (APO1) gene. The Habataki allele of the APO1 locus in a near-isogenic line also resulted in grain yield loss upon ozone exposure, suggesting APO1 involvement in ozone-induced yield loss. Only a few differences in the APO1 amino acid sequences were detected between the cultivars, but the APO1 transcript level was oppositely regulated by ozone exposure: i.e., it increased in Sasanishiki and decreased in Habataki. Interestingly, the levels of some phytohormones (jasmonic acid, jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, and abscisic acid) known to be involved in attenuation of ozone-induced leaf injury tended to decrease in Sasanishiki but to increase in Habataki upon ozone exposure. These data indicate that ozone-induced grain yield loss in Habataki is caused by a reduction in the APO1 transcript level through an increase in the levels of phytohormones that reduce leaf damage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus