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Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly affect quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

Zhu L, Huang D, Shi L, Liang L, Xu T, Chang M, Chen W, Wu D, Zhang F, Fang X - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Bottom Line: Food avoidance and social reaction scores of female patients were significantly lower than those of male patients (p < 0.05 each).The degree of defecation urgency, frequency of passing mucus and psychomotor retardation were independent factors predicting reduced QOL in IBS-D patients.Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly reduce the QOL of IBS-D patients, with gender differences in the impact of both factors on QOL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 1# Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. zhuliming_2000@aliyun.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL). Although intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, as well as comorbid psychological disorders, may reduce the QOL of IBS patients, the primary determinant of QOL in these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to identify the main factors affecting QOL in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D).

Methods: Consecutive patients meeting the Rome III Diagnostic Criteria for IBS-D were enrolled in this study. Patients with organic diseases were excluded. The intestinal symptoms, psychological states and QOL of these patients were evaluated using IBS-specific symptom questionnaires, the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), and the Chinese version of the IBS-QOL instrument. Overall scores for intestinal symptoms were calculated by frequency and degree.

Results: This study enrolled 227 IBS-D patients, of mean age 44.68 ± 10.81 years. Their mean overall IBS-QOL score was 71.68 ± 18.54, with the lowest score being for food avoidance (53.71 ± 26.92). Overall IBS-QOL score correlated negatively with overall scores of intestinal symptoms and HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Overall intestinal symptoms scores correlated negatively with HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Scores of HAMD, HAMA and structural factors (i.e., anxiety/somatization, cognitive disorder, psychomotor retardation, psychic anxiety, and somatic anxiety) were significantly higher in female than in male patients (p < 0.01). Food avoidance and social reaction scores of female patients were significantly lower than those of male patients (p < 0.05 each). The degree of defecation urgency, frequency of passing mucus and psychomotor retardation were independent factors predicting reduced QOL in IBS-D patients.

Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly reduce the QOL of IBS-D patients, with gender differences in the impact of both factors on QOL.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between overall IBS-QOL scores and scores on the (a) HAMD and (b) HAMA. Overall IBS- QOL scores were significantly negatively correlated with HAMD (r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000) and HAMA (r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000) scores.
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Fig1: Correlation between overall IBS-QOL scores and scores on the (a) HAMD and (b) HAMA. Overall IBS- QOL scores were significantly negatively correlated with HAMD (r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000) and HAMA (r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000) scores.

Mentions: The mean HAMD score was 13.92 ± 5.90 and the mean HAMA score was 17.19 ± 7.37. Both HAMD score [r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000 (Figure 1a)] and HAMA score [r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000 (Figure 1b)] showed significant negative correlations with overall IBS-QOL score.Figure 1


Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly affect quality of life of patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

Zhu L, Huang D, Shi L, Liang L, Xu T, Chang M, Chen W, Wu D, Zhang F, Fang X - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2015)

Correlation between overall IBS-QOL scores and scores on the (a) HAMD and (b) HAMA. Overall IBS- QOL scores were significantly negatively correlated with HAMD (r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000) and HAMA (r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000) scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414422&req=5

Fig1: Correlation between overall IBS-QOL scores and scores on the (a) HAMD and (b) HAMA. Overall IBS- QOL scores were significantly negatively correlated with HAMD (r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000) and HAMA (r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000) scores.
Mentions: The mean HAMD score was 13.92 ± 5.90 and the mean HAMA score was 17.19 ± 7.37. Both HAMD score [r1 = -0.460, p = 0.000 (Figure 1a)] and HAMA score [r2 = -0.434, p = 0.000 (Figure 1b)] showed significant negative correlations with overall IBS-QOL score.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Food avoidance and social reaction scores of female patients were significantly lower than those of male patients (p < 0.05 each).The degree of defecation urgency, frequency of passing mucus and psychomotor retardation were independent factors predicting reduced QOL in IBS-D patients.Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly reduce the QOL of IBS-D patients, with gender differences in the impact of both factors on QOL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 1# Shuaifuyuan, Dongcheng District, Beijing, 100730, China. zhuliming_2000@aliyun.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL). Although intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, as well as comorbid psychological disorders, may reduce the QOL of IBS patients, the primary determinant of QOL in these patients remains unclear. This study aimed to identify the main factors affecting QOL in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D).

Methods: Consecutive patients meeting the Rome III Diagnostic Criteria for IBS-D were enrolled in this study. Patients with organic diseases were excluded. The intestinal symptoms, psychological states and QOL of these patients were evaluated using IBS-specific symptom questionnaires, the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), and the Chinese version of the IBS-QOL instrument. Overall scores for intestinal symptoms were calculated by frequency and degree.

Results: This study enrolled 227 IBS-D patients, of mean age 44.68 ± 10.81 years. Their mean overall IBS-QOL score was 71.68 ± 18.54, with the lowest score being for food avoidance (53.71 ± 26.92). Overall IBS-QOL score correlated negatively with overall scores of intestinal symptoms and HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Overall intestinal symptoms scores correlated negatively with HAMD and HAMA scores (p < 0.001 each). Scores of HAMD, HAMA and structural factors (i.e., anxiety/somatization, cognitive disorder, psychomotor retardation, psychic anxiety, and somatic anxiety) were significantly higher in female than in male patients (p < 0.01). Food avoidance and social reaction scores of female patients were significantly lower than those of male patients (p < 0.05 each). The degree of defecation urgency, frequency of passing mucus and psychomotor retardation were independent factors predicting reduced QOL in IBS-D patients.

Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and psychological factors jointly reduce the QOL of IBS-D patients, with gender differences in the impact of both factors on QOL.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus