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Therapeutic hypothermia modifies perinatal asphyxia-induced changes of the corpus callosum and outcome in neonates.

Alderliesten T, de Vries LS, Khalil Y, van Haastert IC, Benders MJ, Koopman-Esseboom C, Groenendaal F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In infants treated with hypothermia lower ADC values than with normothermia were associated with a poor outcome, supporting neuroprotective effects of hypothermia.Field strength did not affect ADC values.Lower ADC values were associated with an adverse outcome, but cut-off levels were lower after hypothermia (1.024 x 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.969 x 10-3 mm2/s).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT?: Diffusion-weighted MRI has demonstrated changes in the corpus callosum of term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. The severity of cerebral changes demonstrated using diffusion-weighted MRI is difficult to assess without measuring values of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC). WHAT IS NEW?: ADC values of the anterior part of the corpus callosum are slightly higher than of the posterior part in full term infants with perinatal asphyxia. Low ADC values of the corpus callosum were associated with an adverse outcome in infants with perinatal asphyxia. In infants treated with hypothermia lower ADC values than with normothermia were associated with a poor outcome, supporting neuroprotective effects of hypothermia.

Background: Using MRI, changes can be detected in the corpus callosum (CC) following perinatal asphyxia which are associated with later neurodevelopmental outcome.

Aim: To study the association between the apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) in the CC on MRI in neonates with perinatal asphyxia and neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of age.

Subjects, methods: Of 121 infants 32 (26%) died and 13 (11%) survived with an adverse neurological outcome. Sixty-five (54%) received therapeutic hypothermia. MRI was performed within 7 days after birth using a 1.5 T or 3.0 T system, and ADC values were measured in the anterior and posterior CC. The association between ADC and composite outcome (death or abnormal neurodevelopment) was analyzed for both normothermia and hypothermia cases using receiver operating characteristics.

Results: ADC values of the posterior CC were lower than of the anterior part (mean difference 0.050 x 10-3 mm2/s, p<0.001). Field strength did not affect ADC values. ADC values of the posterior part of the CC were significantly lower in infants with basal ganglia/thalamus or near total brain injury (p<0.001). Lower ADC values were associated with an adverse outcome, but cut-off levels were lower after hypothermia (1.024 x 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.969 x 10-3 mm2/s).

Conclusion: Low ADC values of the posterior part of the corpus callosum are associated with an adverse outcome in term or near term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. Therapeutic hypothermia slightly modifies this association, showing that lower values were needed for an adverse outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ADC values (x 10-3 mm2/s) for normothermic and hypothermia-treated infants versus time after birth.Infants with an abnormal outcome are indicated with closed symbols.
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pone.0123230.g002: ADC values (x 10-3 mm2/s) for normothermic and hypothermia-treated infants versus time after birth.Infants with an abnormal outcome are indicated with closed symbols.

Mentions: ADC values of the posterior part of the CC, temperature regimen, outcome, and time after birth are presented in Fig 2.


Therapeutic hypothermia modifies perinatal asphyxia-induced changes of the corpus callosum and outcome in neonates.

Alderliesten T, de Vries LS, Khalil Y, van Haastert IC, Benders MJ, Koopman-Esseboom C, Groenendaal F - PLoS ONE (2015)

ADC values (x 10-3 mm2/s) for normothermic and hypothermia-treated infants versus time after birth.Infants with an abnormal outcome are indicated with closed symbols.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414268&req=5

pone.0123230.g002: ADC values (x 10-3 mm2/s) for normothermic and hypothermia-treated infants versus time after birth.Infants with an abnormal outcome are indicated with closed symbols.
Mentions: ADC values of the posterior part of the CC, temperature regimen, outcome, and time after birth are presented in Fig 2.

Bottom Line: In infants treated with hypothermia lower ADC values than with normothermia were associated with a poor outcome, supporting neuroprotective effects of hypothermia.Field strength did not affect ADC values.Lower ADC values were associated with an adverse outcome, but cut-off levels were lower after hypothermia (1.024 x 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.969 x 10-3 mm2/s).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT?: Diffusion-weighted MRI has demonstrated changes in the corpus callosum of term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. The severity of cerebral changes demonstrated using diffusion-weighted MRI is difficult to assess without measuring values of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC). WHAT IS NEW?: ADC values of the anterior part of the corpus callosum are slightly higher than of the posterior part in full term infants with perinatal asphyxia. Low ADC values of the corpus callosum were associated with an adverse outcome in infants with perinatal asphyxia. In infants treated with hypothermia lower ADC values than with normothermia were associated with a poor outcome, supporting neuroprotective effects of hypothermia.

Background: Using MRI, changes can be detected in the corpus callosum (CC) following perinatal asphyxia which are associated with later neurodevelopmental outcome.

Aim: To study the association between the apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) in the CC on MRI in neonates with perinatal asphyxia and neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of age.

Subjects, methods: Of 121 infants 32 (26%) died and 13 (11%) survived with an adverse neurological outcome. Sixty-five (54%) received therapeutic hypothermia. MRI was performed within 7 days after birth using a 1.5 T or 3.0 T system, and ADC values were measured in the anterior and posterior CC. The association between ADC and composite outcome (death or abnormal neurodevelopment) was analyzed for both normothermia and hypothermia cases using receiver operating characteristics.

Results: ADC values of the posterior CC were lower than of the anterior part (mean difference 0.050 x 10-3 mm2/s, p<0.001). Field strength did not affect ADC values. ADC values of the posterior part of the CC were significantly lower in infants with basal ganglia/thalamus or near total brain injury (p<0.001). Lower ADC values were associated with an adverse outcome, but cut-off levels were lower after hypothermia (1.024 x 10-3 mm2/s vs 0.969 x 10-3 mm2/s).

Conclusion: Low ADC values of the posterior part of the corpus callosum are associated with an adverse outcome in term or near term neonates with perinatal asphyxia. Therapeutic hypothermia slightly modifies this association, showing that lower values were needed for an adverse outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus