Limits...
Look away: arterial and venous intravascular embolisation following shotgun injury.

Vedelago J, Dick E, Thomas R, Jones B, Kirmi O, Becker J, Alavi A, Gedroyc W - J Trauma Manag Outcomes (2014)

Bottom Line: We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury.The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis.This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, St. Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury. The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis. Radiologists and Trauma Physicians should be aware that post shotgun injury, the likelihood of an embolised shot pellet is increased compared to other types of firearm missile injury, and should therefore search away from the site of injury to find such missiles. Shotgun pellets may travel in an antegrade or a retrograde intravascular direction - both were seen in these cases - and may not be clinically obvious. This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial images CT carotid and Circle of Willis angiogram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414003&req=5

Fig4: Axial images CT carotid and Circle of Willis angiogram.

Mentions: CT angiography of the neck revealed a focal dissection (FigureĀ 4 arrow) and linear focus of thrombus within the right common carotid artery 5 cm inferior to the bifurcation, at the presumed arterial entry point of the embolised pellet. A large surrounding haematoma, but no active arterial extravasation of contrast, was present. The pulmonary venous system, a second potential entry site described [1], was unremarkable.Figure 4


Look away: arterial and venous intravascular embolisation following shotgun injury.

Vedelago J, Dick E, Thomas R, Jones B, Kirmi O, Becker J, Alavi A, Gedroyc W - J Trauma Manag Outcomes (2014)

Axial images CT carotid and Circle of Willis angiogram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4414003&req=5

Fig4: Axial images CT carotid and Circle of Willis angiogram.
Mentions: CT angiography of the neck revealed a focal dissection (FigureĀ 4 arrow) and linear focus of thrombus within the right common carotid artery 5 cm inferior to the bifurcation, at the presumed arterial entry point of the embolised pellet. A large surrounding haematoma, but no active arterial extravasation of contrast, was present. The pulmonary venous system, a second potential entry site described [1], was unremarkable.Figure 4

Bottom Line: We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury.The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis.This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiology Department, St. Mary's Hospital, Praed Street, London, W2 1NY United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
We describe two cases of intravascular embolization of shotgun pellets found distant to the entry site of penetrating firearm injury. The cases demonstrate antegrade embolization of a shotgun pellet from neck to right middle cerebral artery, and antegrade followed by retrograde venous embolization through the left lower limb to pelvis. Radiologists and Trauma Physicians should be aware that post shotgun injury, the likelihood of an embolised shot pellet is increased compared to other types of firearm missile injury, and should therefore search away from the site of injury to find such missiles. Shotgun pellets may travel in an antegrade or a retrograde intravascular direction - both were seen in these cases - and may not be clinically obvious. This underscores the importance of a meticuluous search through all images, including CT scout images, for evidence of their presence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus