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Increasing Accuracy: A New Design and Algorithm for Automatically Measuring Weights, Travel Direction and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) of Penguins.

Afanasyev V, Buldyrev SV, Dunn MJ, Robst J, Preston M, Bremner SF, Briggs DR, Brown R, Adlard S, Peat HJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated.Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options.This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge's accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB30ET, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A fully automated weighbridge using a new algorithm and mechanics integrated with a Radio Frequency Identification System is described. It is currently in use collecting data on Macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) at Bird Island, South Georgia. The technology allows researchers to collect very large, highly accurate datasets of both penguin weight and direction of their travel into or out of a breeding colony, providing important contributory information to help understand penguin breeding success, reproductive output and availability of prey. Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated. Passive radio frequency tags implanted into penguins allow researchers to match weight and trip direction to individual birds. Low unit and operation costs, low maintenance needs, simple operator requirements and accurate time stamping of every record are all important features of this type of weighbridge, as is its proven ability to operate 24 hours a day throughout a breeding season, regardless of temperature or weather conditions. Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options. This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge's accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph showing the weighbridge location.The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea.
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pone.0126292.g002: Photograph showing the weighbridge location.The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea.

Mentions: The weighbridge was deployed next to a relatively small breeding colony (approximately 400 pairs) of macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus), at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°00' S, 38°03' W). Monitoring of macaroni penguins has taken place at this locality (Fig 2) since 1982 and submitted to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) Ecosystems Monitoring Programme (CEMP) since 1989. A total of 2375 penguins from this colony have been implanted with radio frequency identification transponders (RFID tags) since 2003; an average of approximately 100 adults and 100 chicks receiving implants under their skin each year following standard methodology [10,13,16,20,21]. The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea. A gateway, containing the weighbridge was built on this route to ensure that penguins have to cross the weighbridge when both leaving, and returning to, the colony.


Increasing Accuracy: A New Design and Algorithm for Automatically Measuring Weights, Travel Direction and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) of Penguins.

Afanasyev V, Buldyrev SV, Dunn MJ, Robst J, Preston M, Bremner SF, Briggs DR, Brown R, Adlard S, Peat HJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Photograph showing the weighbridge location.The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4404094&req=5

pone.0126292.g002: Photograph showing the weighbridge location.The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea.
Mentions: The weighbridge was deployed next to a relatively small breeding colony (approximately 400 pairs) of macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus), at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°00' S, 38°03' W). Monitoring of macaroni penguins has taken place at this locality (Fig 2) since 1982 and submitted to the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) Ecosystems Monitoring Programme (CEMP) since 1989. A total of 2375 penguins from this colony have been implanted with radio frequency identification transponders (RFID tags) since 2003; an average of approximately 100 adults and 100 chicks receiving implants under their skin each year following standard methodology [10,13,16,20,21]. The terrain around the colony is such that there is only one route penguins can take both on their approach to the colony and on their return to the sea. A gateway, containing the weighbridge was built on this route to ensure that penguins have to cross the weighbridge when both leaving, and returning to, the colony.

Bottom Line: Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated.Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options.This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge's accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB30ET, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
A fully automated weighbridge using a new algorithm and mechanics integrated with a Radio Frequency Identification System is described. It is currently in use collecting data on Macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) at Bird Island, South Georgia. The technology allows researchers to collect very large, highly accurate datasets of both penguin weight and direction of their travel into or out of a breeding colony, providing important contributory information to help understand penguin breeding success, reproductive output and availability of prey. Reliable discrimination between single and multiple penguin crossings is demonstrated. Passive radio frequency tags implanted into penguins allow researchers to match weight and trip direction to individual birds. Low unit and operation costs, low maintenance needs, simple operator requirements and accurate time stamping of every record are all important features of this type of weighbridge, as is its proven ability to operate 24 hours a day throughout a breeding season, regardless of temperature or weather conditions. Users are able to define required levels of accuracy by adjusting filters and raw data are automatically recorded and stored allowing for a range of processing options. This paper presents the underlying principles, design specification and system description, provides evidence of the weighbridge's accurate performance and demonstrates how its design is a significant improvement on existing systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus