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Evaluating the implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine supplementary dose program in Australian primary health care settings.

Ward KF, Trent M, Hull BP, Quinn HE, Dey A, Menzies RI - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite the high awareness of the program, reported coverage was lower than that for other PCV supplementary dose programs in Australia and internationally.Lessons learned from this evaluation are relevant for future time-limited childhood vaccination programs.They should also receive program information before parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS), The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Cnr Hawkesbury Road and Hainsworth Street, Westmead, NSW, 2145, Australia. kirsten.ward@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The availability of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines covering a broader range of serotypes, has seen many countries introduce these into their national immunisation program. When transitioning from 7-valent to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, Australia is one of a small number of countries that included a supplementary dose of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to offer protection against additional serotypes to an expanded age group of children. An evaluation of the implementation and uptake of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine supplementary dose was undertaken in two local health districts (LHDs) in New South Wales, Australia.

Methods: A self-administered postal survey of immunisation providers in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast LHDs. Trends in vaccine ordering were examined. Coverage was assessed using data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR).

Results: Of the 177 surveys sent, 125 were returned (70%). Almost all providers (96%) were aware of the 13vPCV supplementary dose program though took an opportunistic approach to program promotion and parental reminders. Supplementary doses of 13vPCV were ordered for 37% of the eligible cohort, mostly in the program's first six months. Coverage as recorded on the ACIR was 27%, though was lower in older children and those not due for scheduled childhood vaccines. Of the children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose, 3% received it at the same time as vaccines due at 12-months of age, and 44% at the time of those due at 18-months of age.

Conclusion: Despite the high awareness of the program, reported coverage was lower than that for other PCV supplementary dose programs in Australia and internationally. This may be influenced by providers' largely opportunistic approach to implementation, under-reporting to the ACIR or vaccine uptake. Lessons learned from this evaluation are relevant for future time-limited childhood vaccination programs. Prior to commencement, providers should be informed about the importance of catch-up/supplementary vaccination for their patients and their active role in promoting this. They should also receive program information before parents. An understanding of parental reasons for non-receipt of time-limited childhood vaccines and evaluation of the effect of aligning supplementary (or catch up) vaccination programs with the NIP schedule would be useful to inform future programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Coverage as recorded on the ACIR, by month, for the supplementary doseaof 13vPCV in children born 1 October 2008 to 31 December 2010 in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast Local Health Districts as at 31 December 2012. a. ‘Supplementary doses’ reported to the ACIR for eligible children during the 13vPCV supplementary dose program include fourth doses of 13vPCV and fourth dose of 7vPCV minus the baseline number of reported fourth doses of 7vPCV per month (n=1).
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Fig2: Coverage as recorded on the ACIR, by month, for the supplementary doseaof 13vPCV in children born 1 October 2008 to 31 December 2010 in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast Local Health Districts as at 31 December 2012. a. ‘Supplementary doses’ reported to the ACIR for eligible children during the 13vPCV supplementary dose program include fourth doses of 13vPCV and fourth dose of 7vPCV minus the baseline number of reported fourth doses of 7vPCV per month (n=1).

Mentions: Data from the ACIR indicate that 27% of the eligible cohort (children aged 12–35 months between October 2011 and September 2012) in NNSW and MNC LHDs received a supplementary dose of 13vPCV during the 12 months of the program. Uptake was similar in both LHDs (NNSW = 27.2%, MNC = 27.3%) and was lower than the average for all NSW (32.8%, range 27.2–39.0%). Coverage was higher in children 12–23 months of age (36.3%) than those 24–35 months of age (14.8%). Uptake was highest in the first two months of the program, and then declined throughout, with an increase in the final month of the program (Figure 2). Of those children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose, 3% received it at the same time as vaccines due at 12 months of age (first dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, first dose of meningococcal type C vaccine and fourth dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b [Hib] vaccine). Furthermore, 44% of children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose received it at the same time as the vaccine given at 18 months of age (varicella).Figure 2


Evaluating the implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine supplementary dose program in Australian primary health care settings.

Ward KF, Trent M, Hull BP, Quinn HE, Dey A, Menzies RI - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Coverage as recorded on the ACIR, by month, for the supplementary doseaof 13vPCV in children born 1 October 2008 to 31 December 2010 in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast Local Health Districts as at 31 December 2012. a. ‘Supplementary doses’ reported to the ACIR for eligible children during the 13vPCV supplementary dose program include fourth doses of 13vPCV and fourth dose of 7vPCV minus the baseline number of reported fourth doses of 7vPCV per month (n=1).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4404082&req=5

Fig2: Coverage as recorded on the ACIR, by month, for the supplementary doseaof 13vPCV in children born 1 October 2008 to 31 December 2010 in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast Local Health Districts as at 31 December 2012. a. ‘Supplementary doses’ reported to the ACIR for eligible children during the 13vPCV supplementary dose program include fourth doses of 13vPCV and fourth dose of 7vPCV minus the baseline number of reported fourth doses of 7vPCV per month (n=1).
Mentions: Data from the ACIR indicate that 27% of the eligible cohort (children aged 12–35 months between October 2011 and September 2012) in NNSW and MNC LHDs received a supplementary dose of 13vPCV during the 12 months of the program. Uptake was similar in both LHDs (NNSW = 27.2%, MNC = 27.3%) and was lower than the average for all NSW (32.8%, range 27.2–39.0%). Coverage was higher in children 12–23 months of age (36.3%) than those 24–35 months of age (14.8%). Uptake was highest in the first two months of the program, and then declined throughout, with an increase in the final month of the program (Figure 2). Of those children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose, 3% received it at the same time as vaccines due at 12 months of age (first dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, first dose of meningococcal type C vaccine and fourth dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b [Hib] vaccine). Furthermore, 44% of children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose received it at the same time as the vaccine given at 18 months of age (varicella).Figure 2

Bottom Line: Despite the high awareness of the program, reported coverage was lower than that for other PCV supplementary dose programs in Australia and internationally.Lessons learned from this evaluation are relevant for future time-limited childhood vaccination programs.They should also receive program information before parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS), The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Cnr Hawkesbury Road and Hainsworth Street, Westmead, NSW, 2145, Australia. kirsten.ward@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The availability of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines covering a broader range of serotypes, has seen many countries introduce these into their national immunisation program. When transitioning from 7-valent to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, Australia is one of a small number of countries that included a supplementary dose of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to offer protection against additional serotypes to an expanded age group of children. An evaluation of the implementation and uptake of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine supplementary dose was undertaken in two local health districts (LHDs) in New South Wales, Australia.

Methods: A self-administered postal survey of immunisation providers in the Northern New South Wales and Mid North Coast LHDs. Trends in vaccine ordering were examined. Coverage was assessed using data from the Australian Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR).

Results: Of the 177 surveys sent, 125 were returned (70%). Almost all providers (96%) were aware of the 13vPCV supplementary dose program though took an opportunistic approach to program promotion and parental reminders. Supplementary doses of 13vPCV were ordered for 37% of the eligible cohort, mostly in the program's first six months. Coverage as recorded on the ACIR was 27%, though was lower in older children and those not due for scheduled childhood vaccines. Of the children who received the 13vPCV supplementary dose, 3% received it at the same time as vaccines due at 12-months of age, and 44% at the time of those due at 18-months of age.

Conclusion: Despite the high awareness of the program, reported coverage was lower than that for other PCV supplementary dose programs in Australia and internationally. This may be influenced by providers' largely opportunistic approach to implementation, under-reporting to the ACIR or vaccine uptake. Lessons learned from this evaluation are relevant for future time-limited childhood vaccination programs. Prior to commencement, providers should be informed about the importance of catch-up/supplementary vaccination for their patients and their active role in promoting this. They should also receive program information before parents. An understanding of parental reasons for non-receipt of time-limited childhood vaccines and evaluation of the effect of aligning supplementary (or catch up) vaccination programs with the NIP schedule would be useful to inform future programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus