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Detection of new genetic variants of Betacoronaviruses in Endemic Frugivorous Bats of Madagascar.

Razanajatovo NH, Nomenjanahary LA, Wilkinson DA, Razafimanahaka JH, Goodman SM, Jenkins RK, Jones JP, Heraud JM - Virol. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Certain Malagasy bats can be frequently found in close contact with humans and frugivorous bats feed in the same trees where people collect and consume fruits and are hunted and consumed as bush meat.Our findings suggest that CoVs circulate in frugivorous bats of Madagascar, demonstrating the needs to evaluate spillover risk to human populations especially for individuals that hunt and consume infected bats.Possible dispersal mechanisms as to how coronaviruses arrived on Madagascar are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Unit, Institut Pasteur of Madagascar, Ambatofotsikely, BP 1274, Antananarivo, Madagascar, Dummy_Only. norosoa@pasteur.mg.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bats are amongst the natural reservoirs of many coronaviruses (CoVs) of which some can lead to severe infection in human. African bats are known to harbor a range of pathogens (e.g., Ebola and Marburg viruses) that can infect humans and cause disease outbreaks. A recent study in South Africa isolated a genetic variant closely related to MERS-CoV from an insectivorous bat. Though Madagascar is home to 44 bat species (41 insectivorous and 3 frugivorous) of which 34 are endemic, no data exists concerning the circulation of CoVs in the island's chiropteran fauna. Certain Malagasy bats can be frequently found in close contact with humans and frugivorous bats feed in the same trees where people collect and consume fruits and are hunted and consumed as bush meat. The purpose of our study is to detect and identify CoVs from frugivorous bats in Madagascar to evaluate the risk of human infection from infected bats.

Methods: Frugivorous bats belonging to three species were captured in four different regions of Madagascar. We analyzed fecal and throat swabs to detect the presence of virus through amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, which is highly conserved in all known coronaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from positive specimens.

Results: From 351 frugivorous bats, we detected 14 coronaviruses from two endemic bats species, of which 13 viruses were identified from Pteropus rufus and one from Eidolon dupreanum, giving an overall prevalence of 4.5%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Malagasy strains belong to the genus Betacoronavirus but form three distinct clusters, which seem to represent previously undescribed genetic lineages.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that CoVs circulate in frugivorous bats of Madagascar, demonstrating the needs to evaluate spillover risk to human populations especially for individuals that hunt and consume infected bats. Possible dispersal mechanisms as to how coronaviruses arrived on Madagascar are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of sampling collection. Map of Madagascar showing sites of bats capture (green circle) and sites from the Region of Menabe where at least one CoV was detected from locally occurring bats (Red circles).
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Fig1: Location of sampling collection. Map of Madagascar showing sites of bats capture (green circle) and sites from the Region of Menabe where at least one CoV was detected from locally occurring bats (Red circles).

Mentions: A total of 351 bats belonging to 3 endemic bat species of the family Pteropodidae were captured and sampled: Rousettus madagascariensis (n = 179), Pteropus rufus (n = 76) and Eidolon dupreanum (n = 96) (Table 1). None of the throat swabs from any bat species (n = 265) tested positive for CoV, but 4.5% (14/313) of fecal specimens tested positive for CoV. Prevalence within P. rufus, E. dupreanum and R. madagascariensis was respectively 17.1% (13/76), 1.0% (1/96) and 0% (0/141). All positive specimens originated from bats captured in the Menabe Region (Figure 1).Table 1


Detection of new genetic variants of Betacoronaviruses in Endemic Frugivorous Bats of Madagascar.

Razanajatovo NH, Nomenjanahary LA, Wilkinson DA, Razafimanahaka JH, Goodman SM, Jenkins RK, Jones JP, Heraud JM - Virol. J. (2015)

Location of sampling collection. Map of Madagascar showing sites of bats capture (green circle) and sites from the Region of Menabe where at least one CoV was detected from locally occurring bats (Red circles).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4404003&req=5

Fig1: Location of sampling collection. Map of Madagascar showing sites of bats capture (green circle) and sites from the Region of Menabe where at least one CoV was detected from locally occurring bats (Red circles).
Mentions: A total of 351 bats belonging to 3 endemic bat species of the family Pteropodidae were captured and sampled: Rousettus madagascariensis (n = 179), Pteropus rufus (n = 76) and Eidolon dupreanum (n = 96) (Table 1). None of the throat swabs from any bat species (n = 265) tested positive for CoV, but 4.5% (14/313) of fecal specimens tested positive for CoV. Prevalence within P. rufus, E. dupreanum and R. madagascariensis was respectively 17.1% (13/76), 1.0% (1/96) and 0% (0/141). All positive specimens originated from bats captured in the Menabe Region (Figure 1).Table 1

Bottom Line: Certain Malagasy bats can be frequently found in close contact with humans and frugivorous bats feed in the same trees where people collect and consume fruits and are hunted and consumed as bush meat.Our findings suggest that CoVs circulate in frugivorous bats of Madagascar, demonstrating the needs to evaluate spillover risk to human populations especially for individuals that hunt and consume infected bats.Possible dispersal mechanisms as to how coronaviruses arrived on Madagascar are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virology Unit, Institut Pasteur of Madagascar, Ambatofotsikely, BP 1274, Antananarivo, Madagascar, Dummy_Only. norosoa@pasteur.mg.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bats are amongst the natural reservoirs of many coronaviruses (CoVs) of which some can lead to severe infection in human. African bats are known to harbor a range of pathogens (e.g., Ebola and Marburg viruses) that can infect humans and cause disease outbreaks. A recent study in South Africa isolated a genetic variant closely related to MERS-CoV from an insectivorous bat. Though Madagascar is home to 44 bat species (41 insectivorous and 3 frugivorous) of which 34 are endemic, no data exists concerning the circulation of CoVs in the island's chiropteran fauna. Certain Malagasy bats can be frequently found in close contact with humans and frugivorous bats feed in the same trees where people collect and consume fruits and are hunted and consumed as bush meat. The purpose of our study is to detect and identify CoVs from frugivorous bats in Madagascar to evaluate the risk of human infection from infected bats.

Methods: Frugivorous bats belonging to three species were captured in four different regions of Madagascar. We analyzed fecal and throat swabs to detect the presence of virus through amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, which is highly conserved in all known coronaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from positive specimens.

Results: From 351 frugivorous bats, we detected 14 coronaviruses from two endemic bats species, of which 13 viruses were identified from Pteropus rufus and one from Eidolon dupreanum, giving an overall prevalence of 4.5%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Malagasy strains belong to the genus Betacoronavirus but form three distinct clusters, which seem to represent previously undescribed genetic lineages.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that CoVs circulate in frugivorous bats of Madagascar, demonstrating the needs to evaluate spillover risk to human populations especially for individuals that hunt and consume infected bats. Possible dispersal mechanisms as to how coronaviruses arrived on Madagascar are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus