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Brown adipose tissue activation is inversely related to central obesity and metabolic parameters in adult human.

Wang Q, Zhang M, Xu M, Gu W, Xi Y, Qi L, Li B, Wang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the prevalence of BAT was around 2.7% in our study participants, with a significant sexual difference (5.5% in the females vs. 1.3% in the males; p<0.0001).The BAT positive subjects had lower BMI (P<0.0001), less SFA (P<0.01), VFA (P<0.0001), WC (P<0.0001), lower fasting glucose and triglyceride levels (both P<0.01) and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations (P<0.0001), compared with the BAT negative subjects.Our data suggest that decreased amount of active BAT might be associated with accumulation of visceral fat content and unfavorable metabolic outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Key Laboratory for Endocrine Tumors, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have shown that adult human possess active brown adipose tissue (BAT), which might be important in affecting obesity. However, the supporting evidence on the relationship between BAT and central obesity and metabolic profile in large population based studies is sparse.

Methodology/principal findings: We studied 4011 (2688 males and 1323 females) tumor-free Chinese adults aged 18-89 for BAT activities, visceral/subcutaneous fat areas (VFA/SFA), waist circumferences (WC) and metabolic parameters. We found that the prevalence of BAT was around 2.7% in our study participants, with a significant sexual difference (5.5% in the females vs. 1.3% in the males; p<0.0001). BAT detection was increased in low temperature and declined in elderly subjects. The BAT positive subjects had lower BMI (P<0.0001), less SFA (P<0.01), VFA (P<0.0001), WC (P<0.0001), lower fasting glucose and triglyceride levels (both P<0.01) and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations (P<0.0001), compared with the BAT negative subjects. Robust logistic regression revealed that after adjustment for covariates (including age, sex, BMI, VFA, SFA and WC), age and BMI in the males (0.92 [95%CI, 0.88-0.96] and 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.96], both P ≤0.008) while age and VFA in the females (0.87 [95%CI, 0.83-0.91] and 0.98 [95%CI, 0.97-0.99], respectively, P<0.05) were independently associated with detectable BAT.

Conclusions/significance: Our data suggest that decreased amount of active BAT might be associated with accumulation of visceral fat content and unfavorable metabolic outcomes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The prevalence of brown adipose tissue was inversely related with adiposity.Body-mass-index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters, panel A), Waist Circumferences (panel B), Subcutaneous Fat Areas (Panel C), Visceral Fat Areas (Panel D). The percentage of patients in each group (shown as BMI<25, 25~30, ≥30; central obesity and non-obesity which were defined from waist circumferences; and quintiles of subcutaneous and visceral fat areas) who had detectable BAT was shown, and a univariate analysis was used to assess the significance of differences in the percentages with the use of a chi-square test.
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pone.0123795.g002: The prevalence of brown adipose tissue was inversely related with adiposity.Body-mass-index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters, panel A), Waist Circumferences (panel B), Subcutaneous Fat Areas (Panel C), Visceral Fat Areas (Panel D). The percentage of patients in each group (shown as BMI<25, 25~30, ≥30; central obesity and non-obesity which were defined from waist circumferences; and quintiles of subcutaneous and visceral fat areas) who had detectable BAT was shown, and a univariate analysis was used to assess the significance of differences in the percentages with the use of a chi-square test.

Mentions: The detectable BAT was more frequent in non-obese subjects defined by either BMI or waist circumference (Fig 2A and 2B). The presence of BAT was steeply decreased along with the increasing subcutaneous fat areas (Fig 2C) and especially visceral fat areas (Fig 2D). Both in the males and the females, the BAT positive subjects had lower BMI and less subcutaneous fat areas, visceral fat areas and waist circumference, compared with the BAT non-detectable subjects (P<0.01, Table 2). Consistently, similar results were obtained using another central obesity parameter, waist-to-height ratio [27]. Both in men and in women, the waist-to-height ratio was significantly lower in subjects with detectable BAT (0.48 ± 0.05 vs. 0.52 ± 0.05 in men, P = 0.0004; 0.48 ± 0.04 vs. 0.52 ± 0.06 in women, P <0.0001).


Brown adipose tissue activation is inversely related to central obesity and metabolic parameters in adult human.

Wang Q, Zhang M, Xu M, Gu W, Xi Y, Qi L, Li B, Wang W - PLoS ONE (2015)

The prevalence of brown adipose tissue was inversely related with adiposity.Body-mass-index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters, panel A), Waist Circumferences (panel B), Subcutaneous Fat Areas (Panel C), Visceral Fat Areas (Panel D). The percentage of patients in each group (shown as BMI<25, 25~30, ≥30; central obesity and non-obesity which were defined from waist circumferences; and quintiles of subcutaneous and visceral fat areas) who had detectable BAT was shown, and a univariate analysis was used to assess the significance of differences in the percentages with the use of a chi-square test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403996&req=5

pone.0123795.g002: The prevalence of brown adipose tissue was inversely related with adiposity.Body-mass-index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters, panel A), Waist Circumferences (panel B), Subcutaneous Fat Areas (Panel C), Visceral Fat Areas (Panel D). The percentage of patients in each group (shown as BMI<25, 25~30, ≥30; central obesity and non-obesity which were defined from waist circumferences; and quintiles of subcutaneous and visceral fat areas) who had detectable BAT was shown, and a univariate analysis was used to assess the significance of differences in the percentages with the use of a chi-square test.
Mentions: The detectable BAT was more frequent in non-obese subjects defined by either BMI or waist circumference (Fig 2A and 2B). The presence of BAT was steeply decreased along with the increasing subcutaneous fat areas (Fig 2C) and especially visceral fat areas (Fig 2D). Both in the males and the females, the BAT positive subjects had lower BMI and less subcutaneous fat areas, visceral fat areas and waist circumference, compared with the BAT non-detectable subjects (P<0.01, Table 2). Consistently, similar results were obtained using another central obesity parameter, waist-to-height ratio [27]. Both in men and in women, the waist-to-height ratio was significantly lower in subjects with detectable BAT (0.48 ± 0.05 vs. 0.52 ± 0.05 in men, P = 0.0004; 0.48 ± 0.04 vs. 0.52 ± 0.06 in women, P <0.0001).

Bottom Line: We found that the prevalence of BAT was around 2.7% in our study participants, with a significant sexual difference (5.5% in the females vs. 1.3% in the males; p<0.0001).The BAT positive subjects had lower BMI (P<0.0001), less SFA (P<0.01), VFA (P<0.0001), WC (P<0.0001), lower fasting glucose and triglyceride levels (both P<0.01) and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations (P<0.0001), compared with the BAT negative subjects.Our data suggest that decreased amount of active BAT might be associated with accumulation of visceral fat content and unfavorable metabolic outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shanghai Key Laboratory for Endocrine Tumors, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have shown that adult human possess active brown adipose tissue (BAT), which might be important in affecting obesity. However, the supporting evidence on the relationship between BAT and central obesity and metabolic profile in large population based studies is sparse.

Methodology/principal findings: We studied 4011 (2688 males and 1323 females) tumor-free Chinese adults aged 18-89 for BAT activities, visceral/subcutaneous fat areas (VFA/SFA), waist circumferences (WC) and metabolic parameters. We found that the prevalence of BAT was around 2.7% in our study participants, with a significant sexual difference (5.5% in the females vs. 1.3% in the males; p<0.0001). BAT detection was increased in low temperature and declined in elderly subjects. The BAT positive subjects had lower BMI (P<0.0001), less SFA (P<0.01), VFA (P<0.0001), WC (P<0.0001), lower fasting glucose and triglyceride levels (both P<0.01) and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations (P<0.0001), compared with the BAT negative subjects. Robust logistic regression revealed that after adjustment for covariates (including age, sex, BMI, VFA, SFA and WC), age and BMI in the males (0.92 [95%CI, 0.88-0.96] and 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75-0.96], both P ≤0.008) while age and VFA in the females (0.87 [95%CI, 0.83-0.91] and 0.98 [95%CI, 0.97-0.99], respectively, P<0.05) were independently associated with detectable BAT.

Conclusions/significance: Our data suggest that decreased amount of active BAT might be associated with accumulation of visceral fat content and unfavorable metabolic outcomes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus