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Prediction of brain age suggests accelerated atrophy after traumatic brain injury.

Cole JH, Leech R, Sharp DJ, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiati - Ann. Neurol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The initial model accurately predicted age in healthy individuals (r = 0.92).This PAD predicted cognitive impairment and correlated strongly with the time since TBI, indicating that brain tissue loss increases throughout the chronic postinjury phase.This may be an important factor in the increased susceptibility in TBI patients for dementia and other age-associated conditions, motivating further research into the age-like effects of brain injury and other neurological diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Computational, Clinical, and Cognitive Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

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Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) predicted age difference (PAD) score, stratified by injury severity and injury mechanism. Boxplots of PAD score in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient group are shown, stratified by clinical characteristics. (A) GM PAD score distributions for each Mayo classification: probable/mild, moderate/severe, indicating that brain age is only increased in moderate/severe patients, not in mild TBI. (B) Mayo classification for WM. (C) GM PAD score by mechanism of injury (assault, fall, road–traffic accident [RTA]), indicating that similar levels of increased brain ageing occur independent of mechanism of injury. (D) Mechanism of injury for WM.
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fig05: Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) predicted age difference (PAD) score, stratified by injury severity and injury mechanism. Boxplots of PAD score in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient group are shown, stratified by clinical characteristics. (A) GM PAD score distributions for each Mayo classification: probable/mild, moderate/severe, indicating that brain age is only increased in moderate/severe patients, not in mild TBI. (B) Mayo classification for WM. (C) GM PAD score by mechanism of injury (assault, fall, road–traffic accident [RTA]), indicating that similar levels of increased brain ageing occur independent of mechanism of injury. (D) Mechanism of injury for WM.

Mentions: The discrepancy between predicted and chronological age was related to the severity of injury (Fig 5A, B). Patients with a moderate/severe classification showed increased mean PAD score (GM mean * 5.72 ± 10.97; WM mean * 7.24 ± 11.64), whereas mild (probable) patients were not significantly different from controls (GM mean * −0.42 ± 8.48; WM mean * −0.14 ± 6.1). The presence of focal lesions had no influence on PAD score, as there were no significant differences between those with and without contusions for either GM (mean: 5.99 vs 5.55, p * 0.85) or WM (mean: 6.89 vs. 7.44, p * 0.83). Furthermore, when limiting the TBI patient group to only moderate/severe lesion-free patients (n * 31), ANCOVA for GM and WM still showed significantly greater PAD scores compared to controls (p < 0.001). Although mean PAD score for TBI patients and controls was greater for WM than GM, the relatively high variability meant that this difference was not significant (p > 0.1).


Prediction of brain age suggests accelerated atrophy after traumatic brain injury.

Cole JH, Leech R, Sharp DJ, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiati - Ann. Neurol. (2015)

Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) predicted age difference (PAD) score, stratified by injury severity and injury mechanism. Boxplots of PAD score in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient group are shown, stratified by clinical characteristics. (A) GM PAD score distributions for each Mayo classification: probable/mild, moderate/severe, indicating that brain age is only increased in moderate/severe patients, not in mild TBI. (B) Mayo classification for WM. (C) GM PAD score by mechanism of injury (assault, fall, road–traffic accident [RTA]), indicating that similar levels of increased brain ageing occur independent of mechanism of injury. (D) Mechanism of injury for WM.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig05: Gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) predicted age difference (PAD) score, stratified by injury severity and injury mechanism. Boxplots of PAD score in the traumatic brain injury (TBI) patient group are shown, stratified by clinical characteristics. (A) GM PAD score distributions for each Mayo classification: probable/mild, moderate/severe, indicating that brain age is only increased in moderate/severe patients, not in mild TBI. (B) Mayo classification for WM. (C) GM PAD score by mechanism of injury (assault, fall, road–traffic accident [RTA]), indicating that similar levels of increased brain ageing occur independent of mechanism of injury. (D) Mechanism of injury for WM.
Mentions: The discrepancy between predicted and chronological age was related to the severity of injury (Fig 5A, B). Patients with a moderate/severe classification showed increased mean PAD score (GM mean * 5.72 ± 10.97; WM mean * 7.24 ± 11.64), whereas mild (probable) patients were not significantly different from controls (GM mean * −0.42 ± 8.48; WM mean * −0.14 ± 6.1). The presence of focal lesions had no influence on PAD score, as there were no significant differences between those with and without contusions for either GM (mean: 5.99 vs 5.55, p * 0.85) or WM (mean: 6.89 vs. 7.44, p * 0.83). Furthermore, when limiting the TBI patient group to only moderate/severe lesion-free patients (n * 31), ANCOVA for GM and WM still showed significantly greater PAD scores compared to controls (p < 0.001). Although mean PAD score for TBI patients and controls was greater for WM than GM, the relatively high variability meant that this difference was not significant (p > 0.1).

Bottom Line: The initial model accurately predicted age in healthy individuals (r = 0.92).This PAD predicted cognitive impairment and correlated strongly with the time since TBI, indicating that brain tissue loss increases throughout the chronic postinjury phase.This may be an important factor in the increased susceptibility in TBI patients for dementia and other age-associated conditions, motivating further research into the age-like effects of brain injury and other neurological diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Computational, Clinical, and Cognitive Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus