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Riverine Landscape Patch Heterogeneity Drives Riparian Ant Assemblages in the Scioto River Basin, USA.

Tagwireyi P, Sullivan SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches.Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57).These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian arthropods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH, 43210, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although the principles of landscape ecology are increasingly extended to include riverine landscapes, explicit applications are few. We investigated associations between patch heterogeneity and riparian ant assemblages at 12 riverine landscapes of the Scioto River, Ohio, USA, that represent urban/developed, agricultural, and mixed (primarily forested, but also wetland, grassland/fallow, and exurban) land-use settings. Using remotely-sensed and ground-collected data, we delineated riverine landscape patch types (crop, grass/herbaceous, gravel, lawn, mudflat, open water, shrub, swamp, and woody vegetation), computed patch metrics (area, density, edge, richness, and shape), and conducted coordinated sampling of surface-active Formicidae assemblages. Ant density and species richness was lower in agricultural riverine landscapes than at mixed or developed reaches (measured using S [total number of species], but not using Menhinick's Index [DM]), whereas ant diversity (using the Berger-Park Index [DBP]) was highest in agricultural reaches. We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches. However, certain characteristics of patches influenced ant communities. Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57). Patch area, edge, and shape emerged as important predictors of DBP (R2 = 0.62) whereas patch area, edge, and density were strongly related to ant density (R2 = 0.65). Non-metric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarities distinguished ant assemblage composition in grass and swamp patches from crop, gravel, lawn, and shrub as well as ant assemblages in woody vegetation patches from crop, lawn, and gravel (stress = 0.18, R2 = 0.64). These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Location of the study system.The Scioto and Olentangy Rivers of the Scioto River basin of Ohio (USA) along with the twelve riverine landscape study reaches in agriculture, urban/developed, and mixed (forested, grassland, fallow, exurban) land-use classes.
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pone.0124807.g001: Location of the study system.The Scioto and Olentangy Rivers of the Scioto River basin of Ohio (USA) along with the twelve riverine landscape study reaches in agriculture, urban/developed, and mixed (forested, grassland, fallow, exurban) land-use classes.

Mentions: Our study included 12 1,500-meter (m) riverine landscapes (i.e., study reaches) along ~200 km of the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers (Fig 1) that represented typical aquatic (e.g., flow, geomorphology) and riparian (e.g., vegetation, land use) characteristics of the river system at large. To select study reaches, we first used the National Land Cover Database [34] land-use maps in ArcGIS 10.1 (ESRI, Redlands, California, USA) to characterize LULC within a 500-m buffer of the main channel following Alberts, Sullivan and Kautza [36]. Subsequently, we classified study reaches as agricultural or developed if their adjacent riparian zones (within the 500-m buffer on each side and within the suprabankfull inundation area) were predominantly characterized by these LULC types (> 66% of total LULC by area, after Kawula [37]). Developed reaches were defined as riverine landscapes found in a city or town, with the most highly developed reaches located in and around Columbus, Ohio. Those riverine landscapes that had no predominant LULC were classified as “mixed”. Within each of these three land-use classifications (i.e., developed, agriculture, mixed), we then systematically selected five developed, five mixed, and two agricultural reaches. Although the study reaches were distributed along the length of the river, LULC patterns in the watershed and limited access to some stretches precluded a balanced design and equidistant sampling. Study reaches were separated by distance of 18.3 river km on average, although there was high variability (SD = 15.4 km).


Riverine Landscape Patch Heterogeneity Drives Riparian Ant Assemblages in the Scioto River Basin, USA.

Tagwireyi P, Sullivan SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Location of the study system.The Scioto and Olentangy Rivers of the Scioto River basin of Ohio (USA) along with the twelve riverine landscape study reaches in agriculture, urban/developed, and mixed (forested, grassland, fallow, exurban) land-use classes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403917&req=5

pone.0124807.g001: Location of the study system.The Scioto and Olentangy Rivers of the Scioto River basin of Ohio (USA) along with the twelve riverine landscape study reaches in agriculture, urban/developed, and mixed (forested, grassland, fallow, exurban) land-use classes.
Mentions: Our study included 12 1,500-meter (m) riverine landscapes (i.e., study reaches) along ~200 km of the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers (Fig 1) that represented typical aquatic (e.g., flow, geomorphology) and riparian (e.g., vegetation, land use) characteristics of the river system at large. To select study reaches, we first used the National Land Cover Database [34] land-use maps in ArcGIS 10.1 (ESRI, Redlands, California, USA) to characterize LULC within a 500-m buffer of the main channel following Alberts, Sullivan and Kautza [36]. Subsequently, we classified study reaches as agricultural or developed if their adjacent riparian zones (within the 500-m buffer on each side and within the suprabankfull inundation area) were predominantly characterized by these LULC types (> 66% of total LULC by area, after Kawula [37]). Developed reaches were defined as riverine landscapes found in a city or town, with the most highly developed reaches located in and around Columbus, Ohio. Those riverine landscapes that had no predominant LULC were classified as “mixed”. Within each of these three land-use classifications (i.e., developed, agriculture, mixed), we then systematically selected five developed, five mixed, and two agricultural reaches. Although the study reaches were distributed along the length of the river, LULC patterns in the watershed and limited access to some stretches precluded a balanced design and equidistant sampling. Study reaches were separated by distance of 18.3 river km on average, although there was high variability (SD = 15.4 km).

Bottom Line: We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches.Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57).These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian arthropods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Rd., Columbus, OH, 43210, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Although the principles of landscape ecology are increasingly extended to include riverine landscapes, explicit applications are few. We investigated associations between patch heterogeneity and riparian ant assemblages at 12 riverine landscapes of the Scioto River, Ohio, USA, that represent urban/developed, agricultural, and mixed (primarily forested, but also wetland, grassland/fallow, and exurban) land-use settings. Using remotely-sensed and ground-collected data, we delineated riverine landscape patch types (crop, grass/herbaceous, gravel, lawn, mudflat, open water, shrub, swamp, and woody vegetation), computed patch metrics (area, density, edge, richness, and shape), and conducted coordinated sampling of surface-active Formicidae assemblages. Ant density and species richness was lower in agricultural riverine landscapes than at mixed or developed reaches (measured using S [total number of species], but not using Menhinick's Index [DM]), whereas ant diversity (using the Berger-Park Index [DBP]) was highest in agricultural reaches. We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches. However, certain characteristics of patches influenced ant communities. Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57). Patch area, edge, and shape emerged as important predictors of DBP (R2 = 0.62) whereas patch area, edge, and density were strongly related to ant density (R2 = 0.65). Non-metric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarities distinguished ant assemblage composition in grass and swamp patches from crop, gravel, lawn, and shrub as well as ant assemblages in woody vegetation patches from crop, lawn, and gravel (stress = 0.18, R2 = 0.64). These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus