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A new diagnostic vestibular evoked response.

Dastgheib ZA, Lithgow B, Blakley B, Moussavi Z - J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: The most sensitive representatives of vestibular function were extracted as "features".Linear discriminant analysis and fractal dimension may allow data from a single tilt to be used to adequately characterize the vestibular system.Objective, physiologic assessment of vestibular function may become realistic with application of modern signal processing techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Room E3-512 Eng. Bldg., 75A Chancellor's Circle, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6 Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the development of a new clinically applicable method for assessing vestibular function in humans with particular application in Meniere's disease.

Study design: Sophisticated signal-processing techniques were applied to data from human subject undergoing tilts stimulating the otolith organs and semicircular canals. The most sensitive representatives of vestibular function were extracted as "features".

Methods: After careful consideration of expected response features, Electrovestibulography, a modified electrocochleography, recordings were performed on fourteen Meniere's patients and sixteen healthy controls undergoing controlled tilts. The data were subjected to multiple signal processing techniques to determine which "features" were most predictive of vestibular responses.

Results: Linear discriminant analysis and fractal dimension may allow data from a single tilt to be used to adequately characterize the vestibular system.

Conclusion: Objective, physiologic assessment of vestibular function may become realistic with application of modern signal processing techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An EVestG FP (A) and its firing pattern signals (B and C) of OnBB segment for a CTL tilt of a typical control subject. A: The waveform's minimum point is called the action potential (AP) notch at time=10 msec. The time durations of 4.5 ms (4.5 – 9.0 ms) and 5.2 ms (11.0 – 16.2 ms) before and after the AP are considered the pre- and post- potential intervals respectively. This field potential fires repeatedly during EVestG testing and is modulated by vestibular input.B: The time interval signal of the FP occurences. C: The histogram of the time interval signal.
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Fig3: An EVestG FP (A) and its firing pattern signals (B and C) of OnBB segment for a CTL tilt of a typical control subject. A: The waveform's minimum point is called the action potential (AP) notch at time=10 msec. The time durations of 4.5 ms (4.5 – 9.0 ms) and 5.2 ms (11.0 – 16.2 ms) before and after the AP are considered the pre- and post- potential intervals respectively. This field potential fires repeatedly during EVestG testing and is modulated by vestibular input.B: The time interval signal of the FP occurences. C: The histogram of the time interval signal.

Mentions: An average field potential is illustrated in Figure 3 top. Each FP fires many times representing its firing pattern. The firing pattern of the FP is presented by 1) the time intervals between each two successive FP occurrences, as in Figure 3 lower left, and 2) the probability distribution function (pdf) of the time intervals estimated by the histogram of time interval data as shown in Figure 3 lower right.Figure 3


A new diagnostic vestibular evoked response.

Dastgheib ZA, Lithgow B, Blakley B, Moussavi Z - J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2015)

An EVestG FP (A) and its firing pattern signals (B and C) of OnBB segment for a CTL tilt of a typical control subject. A: The waveform's minimum point is called the action potential (AP) notch at time=10 msec. The time durations of 4.5 ms (4.5 – 9.0 ms) and 5.2 ms (11.0 – 16.2 ms) before and after the AP are considered the pre- and post- potential intervals respectively. This field potential fires repeatedly during EVestG testing and is modulated by vestibular input.B: The time interval signal of the FP occurences. C: The histogram of the time interval signal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403839&req=5

Fig3: An EVestG FP (A) and its firing pattern signals (B and C) of OnBB segment for a CTL tilt of a typical control subject. A: The waveform's minimum point is called the action potential (AP) notch at time=10 msec. The time durations of 4.5 ms (4.5 – 9.0 ms) and 5.2 ms (11.0 – 16.2 ms) before and after the AP are considered the pre- and post- potential intervals respectively. This field potential fires repeatedly during EVestG testing and is modulated by vestibular input.B: The time interval signal of the FP occurences. C: The histogram of the time interval signal.
Mentions: An average field potential is illustrated in Figure 3 top. Each FP fires many times representing its firing pattern. The firing pattern of the FP is presented by 1) the time intervals between each two successive FP occurrences, as in Figure 3 lower left, and 2) the probability distribution function (pdf) of the time intervals estimated by the histogram of time interval data as shown in Figure 3 lower right.Figure 3

Bottom Line: The most sensitive representatives of vestibular function were extracted as "features".Linear discriminant analysis and fractal dimension may allow data from a single tilt to be used to adequately characterize the vestibular system.Objective, physiologic assessment of vestibular function may become realistic with application of modern signal processing techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Room E3-512 Eng. Bldg., 75A Chancellor's Circle, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6 Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the development of a new clinically applicable method for assessing vestibular function in humans with particular application in Meniere's disease.

Study design: Sophisticated signal-processing techniques were applied to data from human subject undergoing tilts stimulating the otolith organs and semicircular canals. The most sensitive representatives of vestibular function were extracted as "features".

Methods: After careful consideration of expected response features, Electrovestibulography, a modified electrocochleography, recordings were performed on fourteen Meniere's patients and sixteen healthy controls undergoing controlled tilts. The data were subjected to multiple signal processing techniques to determine which "features" were most predictive of vestibular responses.

Results: Linear discriminant analysis and fractal dimension may allow data from a single tilt to be used to adequately characterize the vestibular system.

Conclusion: Objective, physiologic assessment of vestibular function may become realistic with application of modern signal processing techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus