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How do alien plants fit in the space-phylogeny matrix?

Procheş Ş, Forest F, Jose S, De Dominicis M, Ramdhani S, Wiggill T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent advances in the field of plant community phylogenetics and invasion phylogenetics are mostly based on plot-level data, which do not take into consideration the spatial arrangement of individual plants within the plot.Here we use within-plot plant coordinates to investigate the link between the physical distance separating plants, and their phylogenetic relatedness.There is no significant relationship between the proportion of alien plants in the plots and the strength of the physical-phylogenetic distance relationship, suggesting that alien plants are well integrated in the local spatial-phylogenetic landscape.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline of Geography, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in the field of plant community phylogenetics and invasion phylogenetics are mostly based on plot-level data, which do not take into consideration the spatial arrangement of individual plants within the plot. Here we use within-plot plant coordinates to investigate the link between the physical distance separating plants, and their phylogenetic relatedness. We look at two vegetation types (forest and grassland, similar in species richness and in the proportion of alien invasive plants) in subtropical coastal KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The relationship between phylogenetic distance and physical distance is weak in grassland (characterised by higher plant densities and low phylogenetic diversity), and varies substantially in forest vegetation (variable plant density, higher phylogenetic diversity). There is no significant relationship between the proportion of alien plants in the plots and the strength of the physical-phylogenetic distance relationship, suggesting that alien plants are well integrated in the local spatial-phylogenetic landscape.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Factors potentially influencing the results on Mantel tests in our plots.Graphs exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values for grassland (circles) and forest (diamonds) plots. Points above the dashed line indicate significant Mantel tests.
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pone.0123238.g002: Factors potentially influencing the results on Mantel tests in our plots.Graphs exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values for grassland (circles) and forest (diamonds) plots. Points above the dashed line indicate significant Mantel tests.

Mentions: Mantel test r values were mostly positive (always positive and mostly significant in forest, mostly positive and seldom significant in grassland; Fig 2)—overall significantly lower in grassland (F = 10.709; P = 0.004; Fig 1). When using generalised linear models to express Mantel test r values as a function of vegetation type and other variables, the only significant effect was that of vegetation type on the way in which species richness influenced the value of Mantel’s r (t = -2.155, P = 0.0467). The effect of the percentage of alien plants in the assemblage on Mantel’s r was not significant (t = -1.867, P = 0.0816; this was however the second lowest of the twelve P values across all the generalised linear models—including interactions). On the two-dimensional graphs visually exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values (Fig 2), grassland sites formed separate clusters from the bulk of the forest sites, but in most cases there were a few forest plots overlapping the grassland cluster. These patterns were in no obvious way linked to those of phylogenetic clustering or over-dispersion described above. The only clear separation between grassland and forest plots was in the case of phylogenetic diversity. Although grassland and forest values overlapped in both phylogenetic diversity and Mantel r values, grassland sites formed a fairly distinct cluster in the two-dimensional graph, with low values in both (Fig 2).


How do alien plants fit in the space-phylogeny matrix?

Procheş Ş, Forest F, Jose S, De Dominicis M, Ramdhani S, Wiggill T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Factors potentially influencing the results on Mantel tests in our plots.Graphs exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values for grassland (circles) and forest (diamonds) plots. Points above the dashed line indicate significant Mantel tests.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403803&req=5

pone.0123238.g002: Factors potentially influencing the results on Mantel tests in our plots.Graphs exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values for grassland (circles) and forest (diamonds) plots. Points above the dashed line indicate significant Mantel tests.
Mentions: Mantel test r values were mostly positive (always positive and mostly significant in forest, mostly positive and seldom significant in grassland; Fig 2)—overall significantly lower in grassland (F = 10.709; P = 0.004; Fig 1). When using generalised linear models to express Mantel test r values as a function of vegetation type and other variables, the only significant effect was that of vegetation type on the way in which species richness influenced the value of Mantel’s r (t = -2.155, P = 0.0467). The effect of the percentage of alien plants in the assemblage on Mantel’s r was not significant (t = -1.867, P = 0.0816; this was however the second lowest of the twelve P values across all the generalised linear models—including interactions). On the two-dimensional graphs visually exploring links between different plot-level variables and Mantel test r values (Fig 2), grassland sites formed separate clusters from the bulk of the forest sites, but in most cases there were a few forest plots overlapping the grassland cluster. These patterns were in no obvious way linked to those of phylogenetic clustering or over-dispersion described above. The only clear separation between grassland and forest plots was in the case of phylogenetic diversity. Although grassland and forest values overlapped in both phylogenetic diversity and Mantel r values, grassland sites formed a fairly distinct cluster in the two-dimensional graph, with low values in both (Fig 2).

Bottom Line: Recent advances in the field of plant community phylogenetics and invasion phylogenetics are mostly based on plot-level data, which do not take into consideration the spatial arrangement of individual plants within the plot.Here we use within-plot plant coordinates to investigate the link between the physical distance separating plants, and their phylogenetic relatedness.There is no significant relationship between the proportion of alien plants in the plots and the strength of the physical-phylogenetic distance relationship, suggesting that alien plants are well integrated in the local spatial-phylogenetic landscape.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline of Geography, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Private Bag X54001, Durban, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in the field of plant community phylogenetics and invasion phylogenetics are mostly based on plot-level data, which do not take into consideration the spatial arrangement of individual plants within the plot. Here we use within-plot plant coordinates to investigate the link between the physical distance separating plants, and their phylogenetic relatedness. We look at two vegetation types (forest and grassland, similar in species richness and in the proportion of alien invasive plants) in subtropical coastal KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The relationship between phylogenetic distance and physical distance is weak in grassland (characterised by higher plant densities and low phylogenetic diversity), and varies substantially in forest vegetation (variable plant density, higher phylogenetic diversity). There is no significant relationship between the proportion of alien plants in the plots and the strength of the physical-phylogenetic distance relationship, suggesting that alien plants are well integrated in the local spatial-phylogenetic landscape.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus