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Career perspective: Charles M Tipton.

Tipton CM - Extrem Physiol Med (2015)

Bottom Line: This invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti.Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated μG environments.From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Ina Gittings Building, Room 205 A, AZ 85721 Tucson, USA.

ABSTRACT
This invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti. Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated μG environments. From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Select individuals associated with the laboratories of Charles M. Tipton and Carl V. Gisolif at the University of Iowa. Except W. Mitchell, all were enrolled in the Ph.D. program that emphasized Exercise Physiology. Photograph taken in late 1970s. Back row, left to right: K. Marcus, L. Louters, T. Wall, W. Mitchell, J. Edwards, M. Owens. Middle row, left to right: M. Sturek, J. Fruth, P. Kershner. Front row, left to right: C. Tipton, R. Oppliger, T. Bedford, M. Overton, C. Gisolfi. From the collection of Charles M. Tipton.
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Fig2: Select individuals associated with the laboratories of Charles M. Tipton and Carl V. Gisolif at the University of Iowa. Except W. Mitchell, all were enrolled in the Ph.D. program that emphasized Exercise Physiology. Photograph taken in late 1970s. Back row, left to right: K. Marcus, L. Louters, T. Wall, W. Mitchell, J. Edwards, M. Owens. Middle row, left to right: M. Sturek, J. Fruth, P. Kershner. Front row, left to right: C. Tipton, R. Oppliger, T. Bedford, M. Overton, C. Gisolfi. From the collection of Charles M. Tipton.

Mentions: At the time of the 1963 appointment, Physical Education Departments within the Big Ten Conference had agreed to revise their Ph.D. degrees into a discipline-oriented specialization program which emphasized anatomy and histology, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control or motor learning, sports history, and administration [6]. Thus, my first task at Iowa was to develop a graduate degree program in exercise physiology. It was one whose prerequisites included completion of undergraduate courses in the mathematical, biological, physical, and chemical sciences necessary to enter medical school. In addition, students were expected to successfully complete theory and laboratory courses in medical physiology and biochemistry plus classes in cardiovascular pharmacology and endocrinology that were offered either by the Colleges of Medicine or Liberal Arts. Requirements also included graduate courses in biomechanics, motor learning, mastering one foreign language, statistics with research methodology, dissertation research plus theory, and laboratory courses in exercise physiology. With strong support from the Chair, Dr. Louis E. Alley, the program was implemented in 1964, added Dr. Carl V. Gisolfi as the Assistant Director in 1970 and supported by the Graduate College, National Defense Education Act plus National Institute of Health training grant and renewal funds. Interestingly, the renewal application was criticized by reviewers because the “high standards” were causing an elevated drop-out rate. By 1986, the program had graduated 26 individuals with Ph.D. degrees of which 25 (one graduate subsequently developed his own company) had secured academic appointments in select universities throughout the United States (Figure 2). Recently, the publication records of the graduates were evaluated for presentation at a 2015 symposium and according to a 3-25-2015 communication from Dr. Kenneth Baldwin, their collective productivity was approximately 2,000 publications.Figure 2


Career perspective: Charles M Tipton.

Tipton CM - Extrem Physiol Med (2015)

Select individuals associated with the laboratories of Charles M. Tipton and Carl V. Gisolif at the University of Iowa. Except W. Mitchell, all were enrolled in the Ph.D. program that emphasized Exercise Physiology. Photograph taken in late 1970s. Back row, left to right: K. Marcus, L. Louters, T. Wall, W. Mitchell, J. Edwards, M. Owens. Middle row, left to right: M. Sturek, J. Fruth, P. Kershner. Front row, left to right: C. Tipton, R. Oppliger, T. Bedford, M. Overton, C. Gisolfi. From the collection of Charles M. Tipton.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403774&req=5

Fig2: Select individuals associated with the laboratories of Charles M. Tipton and Carl V. Gisolif at the University of Iowa. Except W. Mitchell, all were enrolled in the Ph.D. program that emphasized Exercise Physiology. Photograph taken in late 1970s. Back row, left to right: K. Marcus, L. Louters, T. Wall, W. Mitchell, J. Edwards, M. Owens. Middle row, left to right: M. Sturek, J. Fruth, P. Kershner. Front row, left to right: C. Tipton, R. Oppliger, T. Bedford, M. Overton, C. Gisolfi. From the collection of Charles M. Tipton.
Mentions: At the time of the 1963 appointment, Physical Education Departments within the Big Ten Conference had agreed to revise their Ph.D. degrees into a discipline-oriented specialization program which emphasized anatomy and histology, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control or motor learning, sports history, and administration [6]. Thus, my first task at Iowa was to develop a graduate degree program in exercise physiology. It was one whose prerequisites included completion of undergraduate courses in the mathematical, biological, physical, and chemical sciences necessary to enter medical school. In addition, students were expected to successfully complete theory and laboratory courses in medical physiology and biochemistry plus classes in cardiovascular pharmacology and endocrinology that were offered either by the Colleges of Medicine or Liberal Arts. Requirements also included graduate courses in biomechanics, motor learning, mastering one foreign language, statistics with research methodology, dissertation research plus theory, and laboratory courses in exercise physiology. With strong support from the Chair, Dr. Louis E. Alley, the program was implemented in 1964, added Dr. Carl V. Gisolfi as the Assistant Director in 1970 and supported by the Graduate College, National Defense Education Act plus National Institute of Health training grant and renewal funds. Interestingly, the renewal application was criticized by reviewers because the “high standards” were causing an elevated drop-out rate. By 1986, the program had graduated 26 individuals with Ph.D. degrees of which 25 (one graduate subsequently developed his own company) had secured academic appointments in select universities throughout the United States (Figure 2). Recently, the publication records of the graduates were evaluated for presentation at a 2015 symposium and according to a 3-25-2015 communication from Dr. Kenneth Baldwin, their collective productivity was approximately 2,000 publications.Figure 2

Bottom Line: This invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti.Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated μG environments.From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, University of Arizona, Ina Gittings Building, Room 205 A, AZ 85721 Tucson, USA.

ABSTRACT
This invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti. Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated μG environments. From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus