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Descriptive study of sedentary behaviours in 35,444 French working adults: cross-sectional findings from the ACTI-Cités study.

Saidj M, Menai M, Charreire H, Weber C, Enaux C, Aadahl M, Kesse-Guyot E, Hercberg S, Simon C, Oppert JM - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Negative perceptions towards physical activity were associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), irrespective of day type.Being sedentary at work was associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work.Negative perceptions towards physical activity may influence the amount of time spent in sedentary behaviours.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark. madina.saidj@regionh.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Given the unfavourable health outcomes associated with sedentary behaviours, there is a need to better understand the context in which these behaviours take place to better address this public health concern. We explored self-reported sedentary behaviours by type of day (work/non-work), occupation, and perceptions towards physical activity, in a large sample of adults.

Methods: We assessed sedentary behaviours cross-sectionally in 35,444 working adults (mean ± SD age: 44.5 ± 13.0 y) from the French NutriNet-Santé web-based cohort. Participants self-reported sedentary behaviours, assessed as domain-specific sitting time (work, transport, leisure) and time spent in sedentary entertainment (TV/DVD, computer and other screen-based activities, non-screen-based activities) on workdays and non-workdays, along with occupation type (ranging from mainly sitting to heavy manual work) and perceptions towards physical activity. Associations of each type of sedentary behaviour with occupation type and perceptions towards physical activity were analysed by day type in multiple linear regression analyses.

Results: On workdays, adults spent a mean (SD) of 4.17 (3.07) h/day in work sitting, 1.10 (1.69) h/day in transport sitting, 2.19 (1.62) h/day in leisure-time sitting, 1.53 (1.24) h/day viewing TV/DVDs, 2.19 (2.62) h/day on other screen time, and 0.97 (1.49) on non-screen time. On non-workdays, this was 0.85 (1.53) h/day in transport sitting, 3.19 (2.05) h/day in leisure-time sitting, 2.24 (1.76) h/day viewing TV/DVDs, 1.85 (1.74) h/day on other screen time, and 1.30 (1.35) on non-screen time. Time spent in sedentary behaviours differed by occupation type, with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), in those with sedentary occupations, especially on workdays. Negative perceptions towards physical activity were associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), irrespective of day type.

Conclusions: A substantial amount of waking hours was spent in different types of sedentary behaviours on workdays and non-workdays. Being sedentary at work was associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work. Negative perceptions towards physical activity may influence the amount of time spent in sedentary behaviours. These data should help to better identify target groups in public health interventions to reduce sedentary behaviours in working adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Non-workdays sedentary behaviours and physical activity perceptions. A. Consider yourself an active person (yes, no). B. Physical activity and exercise was a family value (a lot, a little, less / no). C. Importance of physical activity for a healthy lifestyle (very important, important, less important).
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Fig2: Non-workdays sedentary behaviours and physical activity perceptions. A. Consider yourself an active person (yes, no). B. Physical activity and exercise was a family value (a lot, a little, less / no). C. Importance of physical activity for a healthy lifestyle (very important, important, less important).

Mentions: Associations with perceptions towards physical activity are presented graphically for workdays (Figure 1 A-C) and non-workdays (Figure 2 A-C). There was a statistically significant negative association between perceiving oneself as an active person and time spent in all sitting domains and entertainments on workdays (1.A). Likewise, having grown up in a family attaching value to physical activity and exercise was significantly negatively associated with time spent in transport sitting, leisure sitting, and TV/DVD viewing on workdays (1.B). Likewise, perceiving physical activity as important for a healthy lifestyle was significantly negatively associated with time spent in leisure sitting and all sedentary entertainments on workdays (1.C), but the association with work sitting was inverse, i.e. the more important physical activity was perceived, the higher the time sitting at work (1.C). For non-workdays, significantly negative associations were consistent for all sitting and entertainment time, across all three types of perception towards physical activity (2.A-C), i.e. the more negative the perceptions were, the more sedentary behaviour.Figure 1


Descriptive study of sedentary behaviours in 35,444 French working adults: cross-sectional findings from the ACTI-Cités study.

Saidj M, Menai M, Charreire H, Weber C, Enaux C, Aadahl M, Kesse-Guyot E, Hercberg S, Simon C, Oppert JM - BMC Public Health (2015)

Non-workdays sedentary behaviours and physical activity perceptions. A. Consider yourself an active person (yes, no). B. Physical activity and exercise was a family value (a lot, a little, less / no). C. Importance of physical activity for a healthy lifestyle (very important, important, less important).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403769&req=5

Fig2: Non-workdays sedentary behaviours and physical activity perceptions. A. Consider yourself an active person (yes, no). B. Physical activity and exercise was a family value (a lot, a little, less / no). C. Importance of physical activity for a healthy lifestyle (very important, important, less important).
Mentions: Associations with perceptions towards physical activity are presented graphically for workdays (Figure 1 A-C) and non-workdays (Figure 2 A-C). There was a statistically significant negative association between perceiving oneself as an active person and time spent in all sitting domains and entertainments on workdays (1.A). Likewise, having grown up in a family attaching value to physical activity and exercise was significantly negatively associated with time spent in transport sitting, leisure sitting, and TV/DVD viewing on workdays (1.B). Likewise, perceiving physical activity as important for a healthy lifestyle was significantly negatively associated with time spent in leisure sitting and all sedentary entertainments on workdays (1.C), but the association with work sitting was inverse, i.e. the more important physical activity was perceived, the higher the time sitting at work (1.C). For non-workdays, significantly negative associations were consistent for all sitting and entertainment time, across all three types of perception towards physical activity (2.A-C), i.e. the more negative the perceptions were, the more sedentary behaviour.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Negative perceptions towards physical activity were associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), irrespective of day type.Being sedentary at work was associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work.Negative perceptions towards physical activity may influence the amount of time spent in sedentary behaviours.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, Denmark. madina.saidj@regionh.dk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Given the unfavourable health outcomes associated with sedentary behaviours, there is a need to better understand the context in which these behaviours take place to better address this public health concern. We explored self-reported sedentary behaviours by type of day (work/non-work), occupation, and perceptions towards physical activity, in a large sample of adults.

Methods: We assessed sedentary behaviours cross-sectionally in 35,444 working adults (mean ± SD age: 44.5 ± 13.0 y) from the French NutriNet-Santé web-based cohort. Participants self-reported sedentary behaviours, assessed as domain-specific sitting time (work, transport, leisure) and time spent in sedentary entertainment (TV/DVD, computer and other screen-based activities, non-screen-based activities) on workdays and non-workdays, along with occupation type (ranging from mainly sitting to heavy manual work) and perceptions towards physical activity. Associations of each type of sedentary behaviour with occupation type and perceptions towards physical activity were analysed by day type in multiple linear regression analyses.

Results: On workdays, adults spent a mean (SD) of 4.17 (3.07) h/day in work sitting, 1.10 (1.69) h/day in transport sitting, 2.19 (1.62) h/day in leisure-time sitting, 1.53 (1.24) h/day viewing TV/DVDs, 2.19 (2.62) h/day on other screen time, and 0.97 (1.49) on non-screen time. On non-workdays, this was 0.85 (1.53) h/day in transport sitting, 3.19 (2.05) h/day in leisure-time sitting, 2.24 (1.76) h/day viewing TV/DVDs, 1.85 (1.74) h/day on other screen time, and 1.30 (1.35) on non-screen time. Time spent in sedentary behaviours differed by occupation type, with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), in those with sedentary occupations, especially on workdays. Negative perceptions towards physical activity were associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work (both sitting and entertainment time), irrespective of day type.

Conclusions: A substantial amount of waking hours was spent in different types of sedentary behaviours on workdays and non-workdays. Being sedentary at work was associated with more sedentary behaviour outside of work. Negative perceptions towards physical activity may influence the amount of time spent in sedentary behaviours. These data should help to better identify target groups in public health interventions to reduce sedentary behaviours in working adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus