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A flexible and low power telemetric sensing and monitoring system for chronic wound diagnostics.

Mehmood N, Hariz A, Templeton S, Voelcker NH - Biomed Eng Online (2015)

Bottom Line: The performance of the whole telemetric sensing system is validated on a mannequin leg using commercial compression bandages and dressings.Effective range of data transmission is 4-5 m in an open environment.Pre-clinical results on a healthy human subject suggest its clinical usability and value to health practitioners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, , 5001, , Australia. nasir.mehmood@unisa.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-healing chronic wounds, such as venous leg ulcers, can be monitored non-invasively by using modern sensing devices and wireless technologies. The development of such a wireless diagnostic tool may improve chronic wound management by providing evidence on efficacy of treatments being provided. This paper presents a low-power portable telemetric system for wound condition sensing and monitoring. The system aims at measuring and transmitting real-time information of wound-site temperature, sub-bandage pressure and moisture level from within the wound dressing.

Methods: Commercially available non-invasive temperature, moisture, and pressure sensors are interfaced with a telemetry device on a flexible 0.15 mm thick printed circuit material to construct a light-weight, non-invasive, biocompatible, and low-power sensing device. The real-time data obtained is transmitted wirelessly to a portable receiver which displays the measured values. The performance of the whole telemetric sensing system is validated on a mannequin leg using commercial compression bandages and dressings. A number of trials on a healthy human volunteer are performed where treatment conditions were emulated using various compression bandage configurations.

Results: A reliable and repeatable performance of the system is achieved under compression bandage and with minimal discomfort to the volunteer. The system is capable of reporting instantaneous changes in bandage pressure, moisture level and local temperature at wound site with average measurement resolutions of 0.5 mmHg, 3.0% RH, and 0.2°C respectively. Effective range of data transmission is 4-5 m in an open environment.

Conclusions: A flexible and non-invasive sensing system is developed to acquire and wirelessly transmit wound parameters from within a compression bandage and wound dressing worn on a human limb. Pre-clinical results on a healthy human subject suggest its clinical usability and value to health practitioners. However, further performance evaluations of the device on a wider population of healthy human subjects and on patients with chronic wounds are required to confirm its medial usefulness and to quantify its real impact on chronic wound management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental results of moisture and temperature measurements. (a) Graphical plot of moisture values measured using moisture-retentive dressing. Fluid was injected into the dressing through micro-volume extension tubing. The graph indicates a natural rise and fall of moisture level over time (b) Graph showing temperature measurements using the flexible sensing system. The graph shows almost constant readings of the room and the skin temperatures.
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Fig4: Experimental results of moisture and temperature measurements. (a) Graphical plot of moisture values measured using moisture-retentive dressing. Fluid was injected into the dressing through micro-volume extension tubing. The graph indicates a natural rise and fall of moisture level over time (b) Graph showing temperature measurements using the flexible sensing system. The graph shows almost constant readings of the room and the skin temperatures.

Mentions: As the moisture and the temperature measurements are independent of posture changes, different setups were used from those used for sub-bandage pressure measurement. For moisture measurements, a moisture-retentive foam dressing Allevyn™ Adhesive (Smith & Nephew) was used. A small slit was made to insert micro-volume extension set tubing in one corner, and another slit was made to insert the moisture sensor in the opposite corner of the dressing. Since the sensor was dry, the measured moisture level was zero. Fluid was then injected through the tubing after every five minutes until the sensor was soaked and started providing moisture values. After that, the dressing was placed upside down so that the fluid moved away from the sensor until it was completely depleted of moisture. Moisture measurement results are plotted in Figure 4(a).Figure 4


A flexible and low power telemetric sensing and monitoring system for chronic wound diagnostics.

Mehmood N, Hariz A, Templeton S, Voelcker NH - Biomed Eng Online (2015)

Experimental results of moisture and temperature measurements. (a) Graphical plot of moisture values measured using moisture-retentive dressing. Fluid was injected into the dressing through micro-volume extension tubing. The graph indicates a natural rise and fall of moisture level over time (b) Graph showing temperature measurements using the flexible sensing system. The graph shows almost constant readings of the room and the skin temperatures.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403753&req=5

Fig4: Experimental results of moisture and temperature measurements. (a) Graphical plot of moisture values measured using moisture-retentive dressing. Fluid was injected into the dressing through micro-volume extension tubing. The graph indicates a natural rise and fall of moisture level over time (b) Graph showing temperature measurements using the flexible sensing system. The graph shows almost constant readings of the room and the skin temperatures.
Mentions: As the moisture and the temperature measurements are independent of posture changes, different setups were used from those used for sub-bandage pressure measurement. For moisture measurements, a moisture-retentive foam dressing Allevyn™ Adhesive (Smith & Nephew) was used. A small slit was made to insert micro-volume extension set tubing in one corner, and another slit was made to insert the moisture sensor in the opposite corner of the dressing. Since the sensor was dry, the measured moisture level was zero. Fluid was then injected through the tubing after every five minutes until the sensor was soaked and started providing moisture values. After that, the dressing was placed upside down so that the fluid moved away from the sensor until it was completely depleted of moisture. Moisture measurement results are plotted in Figure 4(a).Figure 4

Bottom Line: The performance of the whole telemetric sensing system is validated on a mannequin leg using commercial compression bandages and dressings.Effective range of data transmission is 4-5 m in an open environment.Pre-clinical results on a healthy human subject suggest its clinical usability and value to health practitioners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, , 5001, , Australia. nasir.mehmood@unisa.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-healing chronic wounds, such as venous leg ulcers, can be monitored non-invasively by using modern sensing devices and wireless technologies. The development of such a wireless diagnostic tool may improve chronic wound management by providing evidence on efficacy of treatments being provided. This paper presents a low-power portable telemetric system for wound condition sensing and monitoring. The system aims at measuring and transmitting real-time information of wound-site temperature, sub-bandage pressure and moisture level from within the wound dressing.

Methods: Commercially available non-invasive temperature, moisture, and pressure sensors are interfaced with a telemetry device on a flexible 0.15 mm thick printed circuit material to construct a light-weight, non-invasive, biocompatible, and low-power sensing device. The real-time data obtained is transmitted wirelessly to a portable receiver which displays the measured values. The performance of the whole telemetric sensing system is validated on a mannequin leg using commercial compression bandages and dressings. A number of trials on a healthy human volunteer are performed where treatment conditions were emulated using various compression bandage configurations.

Results: A reliable and repeatable performance of the system is achieved under compression bandage and with minimal discomfort to the volunteer. The system is capable of reporting instantaneous changes in bandage pressure, moisture level and local temperature at wound site with average measurement resolutions of 0.5 mmHg, 3.0% RH, and 0.2°C respectively. Effective range of data transmission is 4-5 m in an open environment.

Conclusions: A flexible and non-invasive sensing system is developed to acquire and wirelessly transmit wound parameters from within a compression bandage and wound dressing worn on a human limb. Pre-clinical results on a healthy human subject suggest its clinical usability and value to health practitioners. However, further performance evaluations of the device on a wider population of healthy human subjects and on patients with chronic wounds are required to confirm its medial usefulness and to quantify its real impact on chronic wound management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus