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Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

Wang Q, Larese-Casanova P, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns.In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way.Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The amount of adsorbed total proteins on selenium coated and uncoated paper towels.Notes: Data are mean ± standard deviation, n=3; *, **, ***P<0.05 compared with the paper towels without (w/o) coating for a treatment after either 24, 48, or 72 hours (hrs).
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f7-ijn-10-2885: The amount of adsorbed total proteins on selenium coated and uncoated paper towels.Notes: Data are mean ± standard deviation, n=3; *, **, ***P<0.05 compared with the paper towels without (w/o) coating for a treatment after either 24, 48, or 72 hours (hrs).

Mentions: Based on the results from protein adsorption assays as shown in Figure 7, the selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels significantly increased protein adsorption over uncoated paper towels after TSB treatment for either 24, 48, or 72 hours. After coating the paper towels with selenium nanoparticles, there was an increase in the surface area and nanoscale roughness, which allowed more proteins in the media to adsorb to the surface of the paper towels. The increased protein adsorption might play an important role in inhibiting bacteria growth on the selenium coated paper towels, because those proteins could interact with bacteria cell membranes and prevent bacteria cells from attaching to the surface. This could eventually prevent bacteria from forming biofilms, thus, inhibiting bacteria growth on the surface.


Inhibition of various gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria growth on selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels.

Wang Q, Larese-Casanova P, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

The amount of adsorbed total proteins on selenium coated and uncoated paper towels.Notes: Data are mean ± standard deviation, n=3; *, **, ***P<0.05 compared with the paper towels without (w/o) coating for a treatment after either 24, 48, or 72 hours (hrs).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403699&req=5

f7-ijn-10-2885: The amount of adsorbed total proteins on selenium coated and uncoated paper towels.Notes: Data are mean ± standard deviation, n=3; *, **, ***P<0.05 compared with the paper towels without (w/o) coating for a treatment after either 24, 48, or 72 hours (hrs).
Mentions: Based on the results from protein adsorption assays as shown in Figure 7, the selenium nanoparticle coated paper towels significantly increased protein adsorption over uncoated paper towels after TSB treatment for either 24, 48, or 72 hours. After coating the paper towels with selenium nanoparticles, there was an increase in the surface area and nanoscale roughness, which allowed more proteins in the media to adsorb to the surface of the paper towels. The increased protein adsorption might play an important role in inhibiting bacteria growth on the selenium coated paper towels, because those proteins could interact with bacteria cell membranes and prevent bacteria cells from attaching to the surface. This could eventually prevent bacteria from forming biofilms, thus, inhibiting bacteria growth on the surface.

Bottom Line: There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns.In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way.Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT
There are wide spread bacterial contamination issues on various paper products, such as paper towels hanging in sink splash zones or those used to clean surfaces, filter papers used in water and air purifying systems, and wrappings used in the food industry; such contamination may lead to the potential spread of bacteria and consequent severe health concerns. In this study, selenium nanoparticles were coated on normal paper towel surfaces through a quick precipitation method, introducing antibacterial properties to the paper towels in a healthy way. Their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation was tested in bacterial assays involving Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The results showed significant and continuous bacteria inhibition with about a 90% reduction from 24 to 72 hours for gram-positive bacteria including S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The selenium coated paper towels also showed significant inhibition of gram-negative bacteria like P. aeruginosa and E. coli growth at about 57% and 84%, respectively, after 72 hours of treatment. Therefore, this study established a promising selenium-based antibacterial strategy to prevent bacterial growth on paper products, which may lead to the avoidance of bacteria spreading and consequent severe health concerns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus