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Sounding Black or White: priming identity and biracial speech.

Gaither SE, Cohen-Goldberg AM, Gidney CL, Maddox KB, Gidney CL, Gidney CL - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Condition-blind coders rated Black-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more Black and White-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more White, both when listening to whole (Study 1a) and thin-sliced (Study 1b) clips.Further linguistic analyses (Studies 2a-c) were inconclusive regarding the features that differed between the two groups.Future directions regarding the need to investigate the intersections between social identity priming and language behavior with a biracial lens are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA ; Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA.

ABSTRACT
Research has shown that priming one's racial identity can alter a biracial individuals' social behavior, but can such priming also influence their speech? Language is often used as a marker of one's social group membership and studies have shown that social context can affect the style of language that a person chooses to use, but this work has yet to be extended to the biracial population. Audio clips were extracted from a previous study involving biracial Black/White participants who had either their Black or White racial identity primed. Condition-blind coders rated Black-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more Black and White-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more White, both when listening to whole (Study 1a) and thin-sliced (Study 1b) clips. Further linguistic analyses (Studies 2a-c) were inconclusive regarding the features that differed between the two groups. Future directions regarding the need to investigate the intersections between social identity priming and language behavior with a biracial lens are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

These means show the original self-reported racial identification of Black- and White-primed biracial participants from Gaither et al. (2013) in addition to the ratings from Study 1a. Lower numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more Black; higher numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more White and more in favor of affirmative action and anxious sounding; error bars represent SE; ∗denotes significant differences between priming groups.
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Figure 1: These means show the original self-reported racial identification of Black- and White-primed biracial participants from Gaither et al. (2013) in addition to the ratings from Study 1a. Lower numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more Black; higher numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more White and more in favor of affirmative action and anxious sounding; error bars represent SE; ∗denotes significant differences between priming groups.

Mentions: There was no significant difference on sounding more anxious between Black-primed (M = 3.93, SD = 1.04) and White-primed participants (M = 3.97, SD = 0.89), t(42) = 0.15, p= 0.88 [see Figure 1 showing the original Gaither et al. (2013) study racial identification results and these results]. Lastly, perceived phenotypicality ratings (degree of Black facial characteristics; see Maddox, 2004) of the biracial participants that were collected in the original study did not affect these outcomes. Therefore, appearing more physically Black did not affect how Black participants sounded.


Sounding Black or White: priming identity and biracial speech.

Gaither SE, Cohen-Goldberg AM, Gidney CL, Maddox KB, Gidney CL, Gidney CL - Front Psychol (2015)

These means show the original self-reported racial identification of Black- and White-primed biracial participants from Gaither et al. (2013) in addition to the ratings from Study 1a. Lower numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more Black; higher numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more White and more in favor of affirmative action and anxious sounding; error bars represent SE; ∗denotes significant differences between priming groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403599&req=5

Figure 1: These means show the original self-reported racial identification of Black- and White-primed biracial participants from Gaither et al. (2013) in addition to the ratings from Study 1a. Lower numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more Black; higher numbers reflect identifying with or sounding more White and more in favor of affirmative action and anxious sounding; error bars represent SE; ∗denotes significant differences between priming groups.
Mentions: There was no significant difference on sounding more anxious between Black-primed (M = 3.93, SD = 1.04) and White-primed participants (M = 3.97, SD = 0.89), t(42) = 0.15, p= 0.88 [see Figure 1 showing the original Gaither et al. (2013) study racial identification results and these results]. Lastly, perceived phenotypicality ratings (degree of Black facial characteristics; see Maddox, 2004) of the biracial participants that were collected in the original study did not affect these outcomes. Therefore, appearing more physically Black did not affect how Black participants sounded.

Bottom Line: Condition-blind coders rated Black-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more Black and White-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more White, both when listening to whole (Study 1a) and thin-sliced (Study 1b) clips.Further linguistic analyses (Studies 2a-c) were inconclusive regarding the features that differed between the two groups.Future directions regarding the need to investigate the intersections between social identity priming and language behavior with a biracial lens are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA ; Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA.

ABSTRACT
Research has shown that priming one's racial identity can alter a biracial individuals' social behavior, but can such priming also influence their speech? Language is often used as a marker of one's social group membership and studies have shown that social context can affect the style of language that a person chooses to use, but this work has yet to be extended to the biracial population. Audio clips were extracted from a previous study involving biracial Black/White participants who had either their Black or White racial identity primed. Condition-blind coders rated Black-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more Black and White-primed biracial participants as sounding significantly more White, both when listening to whole (Study 1a) and thin-sliced (Study 1b) clips. Further linguistic analyses (Studies 2a-c) were inconclusive regarding the features that differed between the two groups. Future directions regarding the need to investigate the intersections between social identity priming and language behavior with a biracial lens are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus