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Elimination of bisphenol a and triclosan using the enzymatic system of autochthonous colombian forest fungi.

Arboleda C, Cabana H, De Pril E, Jones JP, Jiménez GA, Mejía AI, Agathos SN, Penninckx MJ - ISRN Biotechnol (2012)

Bottom Line: The elimination of BPA in the absence of a mediator resulted in production of oligomers of molecular weights of 454, 680, and 906 amu as determined by mass spectra analysis.Ecotoxicological studies using Daphnia pulex to determine lethal concentration (LC50) showed an important reduction of the toxicity of BPA and TCS solutions after enzymatic treatments.Moreover, the exploitation of local biodiversity appears as a potentially promising approach for identifying new efficient strains for biotechnological applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biopolymers Group, Faculty of pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, Antioquia, Colombia ; Laboratory of Microbial Physiology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Institut de Santé Publique, rue Engeland 642, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) are known or suspected potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which may pose a risk to human health and have an environmental impact. Enzyme preparations containing mainly laccases, obtained from Ganoderma stipitatum and Lentinus swartzii, two autochthonous Colombian forest white rot fungi (WRF), previously identified as high enzyme producers, were used to remove BPA and TCS from aqueous solutions. A Box-Behnken factorial design showed that pH, temperature, and duration of treatment were significant model terms for the elimination of BPA and TCS. Our results demonstrated that these EDCs were extensively removed from 5 mg L(-1) solutions after a contact time of 6 hours. Ninety-four percent of TCS and 97.8% of BPA were removed with the enzyme solution from G. stipitatum; 83.2% of TCS and 88.2% of BPA were removed with the L. swartzii enzyme solution. After a 6-hour treatment with enzymes from G. stipitatum and L. swartzii, up to 90% of the estrogenic activity of BPA was lost, as shown by the yeast estrogen screen assay. 2,2-Azino-bis-(3-ethylthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) was used as a mediator (laccase/mediator system) and significantly improved the laccase catalyzed elimination of BPA and TCS. The elimination of BPA in the absence of a mediator resulted in production of oligomers of molecular weights of 454, 680, and 906 amu as determined by mass spectra analysis. The elimination of TCS in the same conditions produced dimers, trimers, and tetramers of molecular weights of 574, 859, and 1146 amu. Ecotoxicological studies using Daphnia pulex to determine lethal concentration (LC50) showed an important reduction of the toxicity of BPA and TCS solutions after enzymatic treatments. Use of laccases emerges thus as a key alternative in the development of innovative wastewater treatment technologies. Moreover, the exploitation of local biodiversity appears as a potentially promising approach for identifying new efficient strains for biotechnological applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Elimination of the estrogenic activity of a 5 mg L−1 solution of BPA with the enzyme preparations from (black lozenge)  G. stipitatum (pH 5 and 60°C) or (black square) L. swartzii (pH 4 and 40°C). The treatments were performed with a final concentration of laccase of 250 U L−1. Means of triplicates ± standard deviation.
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fig4: Elimination of the estrogenic activity of a 5 mg L−1 solution of BPA with the enzyme preparations from (black lozenge) G. stipitatum (pH 5 and 60°C) or (black square) L. swartzii (pH 4 and 40°C). The treatments were performed with a final concentration of laccase of 250 U L−1. Means of triplicates ± standard deviation.

Mentions: Although the elimination of BPA and TCS was studied using the Box-Behnken factorial design, it was of great concern to address the elimination of the estrogenic activity associated with these compounds. To determine the estrogenic activity of the treated solutions, we used the well-established YES assay [33]. TCS was not subjected to this test because of its microbiocidal activity which makes this yeast test nonapplicable [19]. Figure 4 shows a clear estrogenic activity reduction observed after the enzymatic treatment of a 5 mg L−1BPA solution. Upon contacting this solution for 3.5 hours, with 250 U L−1 laccase from L. swartzii, there was a decrease of up to 70% in estrogenic activity and a 50% decrease with an equivalent treatment with laccase from G. stipitatum. Finally, after a 6 h treatment, estrogenicity loss of up to 90% of the BPA solution was observed for the laccases from both strains.


Elimination of bisphenol a and triclosan using the enzymatic system of autochthonous colombian forest fungi.

Arboleda C, Cabana H, De Pril E, Jones JP, Jiménez GA, Mejía AI, Agathos SN, Penninckx MJ - ISRN Biotechnol (2012)

Elimination of the estrogenic activity of a 5 mg L−1 solution of BPA with the enzyme preparations from (black lozenge)  G. stipitatum (pH 5 and 60°C) or (black square) L. swartzii (pH 4 and 40°C). The treatments were performed with a final concentration of laccase of 250 U L−1. Means of triplicates ± standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403572&req=5

fig4: Elimination of the estrogenic activity of a 5 mg L−1 solution of BPA with the enzyme preparations from (black lozenge) G. stipitatum (pH 5 and 60°C) or (black square) L. swartzii (pH 4 and 40°C). The treatments were performed with a final concentration of laccase of 250 U L−1. Means of triplicates ± standard deviation.
Mentions: Although the elimination of BPA and TCS was studied using the Box-Behnken factorial design, it was of great concern to address the elimination of the estrogenic activity associated with these compounds. To determine the estrogenic activity of the treated solutions, we used the well-established YES assay [33]. TCS was not subjected to this test because of its microbiocidal activity which makes this yeast test nonapplicable [19]. Figure 4 shows a clear estrogenic activity reduction observed after the enzymatic treatment of a 5 mg L−1BPA solution. Upon contacting this solution for 3.5 hours, with 250 U L−1 laccase from L. swartzii, there was a decrease of up to 70% in estrogenic activity and a 50% decrease with an equivalent treatment with laccase from G. stipitatum. Finally, after a 6 h treatment, estrogenicity loss of up to 90% of the BPA solution was observed for the laccases from both strains.

Bottom Line: The elimination of BPA in the absence of a mediator resulted in production of oligomers of molecular weights of 454, 680, and 906 amu as determined by mass spectra analysis.Ecotoxicological studies using Daphnia pulex to determine lethal concentration (LC50) showed an important reduction of the toxicity of BPA and TCS solutions after enzymatic treatments.Moreover, the exploitation of local biodiversity appears as a potentially promising approach for identifying new efficient strains for biotechnological applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biopolymers Group, Faculty of pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Antioquia, Calle 67 No. 53-108, Antioquia, Colombia ; Laboratory of Microbial Physiology and Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Institut de Santé Publique, rue Engeland 642, 1180 Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS) are known or suspected potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which may pose a risk to human health and have an environmental impact. Enzyme preparations containing mainly laccases, obtained from Ganoderma stipitatum and Lentinus swartzii, two autochthonous Colombian forest white rot fungi (WRF), previously identified as high enzyme producers, were used to remove BPA and TCS from aqueous solutions. A Box-Behnken factorial design showed that pH, temperature, and duration of treatment were significant model terms for the elimination of BPA and TCS. Our results demonstrated that these EDCs were extensively removed from 5 mg L(-1) solutions after a contact time of 6 hours. Ninety-four percent of TCS and 97.8% of BPA were removed with the enzyme solution from G. stipitatum; 83.2% of TCS and 88.2% of BPA were removed with the L. swartzii enzyme solution. After a 6-hour treatment with enzymes from G. stipitatum and L. swartzii, up to 90% of the estrogenic activity of BPA was lost, as shown by the yeast estrogen screen assay. 2,2-Azino-bis-(3-ethylthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) was used as a mediator (laccase/mediator system) and significantly improved the laccase catalyzed elimination of BPA and TCS. The elimination of BPA in the absence of a mediator resulted in production of oligomers of molecular weights of 454, 680, and 906 amu as determined by mass spectra analysis. The elimination of TCS in the same conditions produced dimers, trimers, and tetramers of molecular weights of 574, 859, and 1146 amu. Ecotoxicological studies using Daphnia pulex to determine lethal concentration (LC50) showed an important reduction of the toxicity of BPA and TCS solutions after enzymatic treatments. Use of laccases emerges thus as a key alternative in the development of innovative wastewater treatment technologies. Moreover, the exploitation of local biodiversity appears as a potentially promising approach for identifying new efficient strains for biotechnological applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus