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Branching pattern of inferior mesenteric artery in a black african population: a dissection study.

Sinkeet S, Mwachaka P, Muthoka J, Saidi H - ISRN Anat (2012)

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusion.An angiographic study to further delineate functionality of the arterial anastomoses in this region is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.

ABSTRACT
Background. Branching pattern of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and pattern of vascular supply to the left colon and rectosigmoid areas, though important during colorectal surgery, display interethnic variations. Further, these regions have notable vascular "weak points" reported to be highly susceptible to ischemic colitis. This study aimed at evaluating the branching pattern of IMA in a black African population. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven formalin-embalmed cadavers (28 Male, 27 Female) were studied. The length, branching pattern, and diameter of IMA at its origin were recorded. Results. IMA mean length and diameter at origin were 30.57 ± 10.0 mm and 4.10 ± 0.9 mm, respectively. IMA most frequently branched into left colic artery and a common sigmoid trunk in 23 cases while the classical branching pattern was observed in only 7 cases. Colic marginal artery was absent at the splenic flexure and sigmoid colon in 7 and 5 cases, respectively. Arc of Riolan was observed in 9 cases. Conclusion. Branching pattern of IMA shows variations from the previously reported cases which might help account for some of the untoward outcomes observed following colon surgery. An angiographic study to further delineate functionality of the arterial anastomoses in this region is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photograph of the posterior abdominal wall showing the aorta and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and its branches. (a) A thin arterial channel (arrowheads) connecting middle colic (MCA) branch of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to the ascending branch of left colic artery (ALCA) is observed. (b) Arrowheads show an arterial connection between the celiac artery (CT) and the left colic artery (LCA) ascending branch. SplA: splenic artery, PV: portal vein, Trv colon: transverse colon. (c) An inner arterial channel (arrowheads) besides the marginal artery (Ma) connecting the proximal SMA to LCA. PANC: pancreas.
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fig1: Photograph of the posterior abdominal wall showing the aorta and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and its branches. (a) A thin arterial channel (arrowheads) connecting middle colic (MCA) branch of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to the ascending branch of left colic artery (ALCA) is observed. (b) Arrowheads show an arterial connection between the celiac artery (CT) and the left colic artery (LCA) ascending branch. SplA: splenic artery, PV: portal vein, Trv colon: transverse colon. (c) An inner arterial channel (arrowheads) besides the marginal artery (Ma) connecting the proximal SMA to LCA. PANC: pancreas.

Mentions: Some variations, however, deserve a special mention. Connecting arterial channels between left colic artery and superior mesenteric artery (Figure 1(a)), and between left colic artery and celiac artery (Figure 1(b)) was observed. In another case, left colic artery gave off a transverse branch to the descending colon and proceeded to give three of the four sigmoid arteries (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)).


Branching pattern of inferior mesenteric artery in a black african population: a dissection study.

Sinkeet S, Mwachaka P, Muthoka J, Saidi H - ISRN Anat (2012)

Photograph of the posterior abdominal wall showing the aorta and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and its branches. (a) A thin arterial channel (arrowheads) connecting middle colic (MCA) branch of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to the ascending branch of left colic artery (ALCA) is observed. (b) Arrowheads show an arterial connection between the celiac artery (CT) and the left colic artery (LCA) ascending branch. SplA: splenic artery, PV: portal vein, Trv colon: transverse colon. (c) An inner arterial channel (arrowheads) besides the marginal artery (Ma) connecting the proximal SMA to LCA. PANC: pancreas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403558&req=5

fig1: Photograph of the posterior abdominal wall showing the aorta and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and its branches. (a) A thin arterial channel (arrowheads) connecting middle colic (MCA) branch of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) to the ascending branch of left colic artery (ALCA) is observed. (b) Arrowheads show an arterial connection between the celiac artery (CT) and the left colic artery (LCA) ascending branch. SplA: splenic artery, PV: portal vein, Trv colon: transverse colon. (c) An inner arterial channel (arrowheads) besides the marginal artery (Ma) connecting the proximal SMA to LCA. PANC: pancreas.
Mentions: Some variations, however, deserve a special mention. Connecting arterial channels between left colic artery and superior mesenteric artery (Figure 1(a)), and between left colic artery and celiac artery (Figure 1(b)) was observed. In another case, left colic artery gave off a transverse branch to the descending colon and proceeded to give three of the four sigmoid arteries (Figures 2(a) and 2(b)).

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusion.An angiographic study to further delineate functionality of the arterial anastomoses in this region is recommended.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Anatomy, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.

ABSTRACT
Background. Branching pattern of inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and pattern of vascular supply to the left colon and rectosigmoid areas, though important during colorectal surgery, display interethnic variations. Further, these regions have notable vascular "weak points" reported to be highly susceptible to ischemic colitis. This study aimed at evaluating the branching pattern of IMA in a black African population. Materials and Methods. Fifty-seven formalin-embalmed cadavers (28 Male, 27 Female) were studied. The length, branching pattern, and diameter of IMA at its origin were recorded. Results. IMA mean length and diameter at origin were 30.57 ± 10.0 mm and 4.10 ± 0.9 mm, respectively. IMA most frequently branched into left colic artery and a common sigmoid trunk in 23 cases while the classical branching pattern was observed in only 7 cases. Colic marginal artery was absent at the splenic flexure and sigmoid colon in 7 and 5 cases, respectively. Arc of Riolan was observed in 9 cases. Conclusion. Branching pattern of IMA shows variations from the previously reported cases which might help account for some of the untoward outcomes observed following colon surgery. An angiographic study to further delineate functionality of the arterial anastomoses in this region is recommended.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus