Limits...
Alternative futures for Borneo show the value of integrating economic and conservation targets across borders.

Runting RK, Meijaard E, Abram NK, Wells JA, Gaveau DL, Ancrenaz M, Posssingham HP, Wich SA, Ardiansyah F, Gumal MT, Ambu LN, Wilson KA - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: We show what could be achieved if the three national jurisdictions of Borneo coordinate efforts to achieve their public policy targets and allow a partial reallocation of planned land uses.We reveal the potential for Borneo to simultaneously retain ∼50% of its land as forests, protect adequate habitat for the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and Bornean elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis), and achieve an opportunity cost saving of over US$43 billion.Such coordination would depend on enhanced information sharing and reforms to land-use planning, which could be supported by the increasingly international nature of economies and conservation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Queensland, Australia [2] Borneo Futures Project, Country Woods 306, Jalan WR Supratman, Pondok Ranji-Rengas, Ciputat 15412, Tangerang, Indonesia [3] School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Balancing economic development with international commitments to protect biodiversity is a global challenge. Achieving this balance requires an understanding of the possible consequences of alternative future scenarios for a range of stakeholders. We employ an integrated economic and environmental planning approach to evaluate four alternative futures for the mega-diverse island of Borneo. We show what could be achieved if the three national jurisdictions of Borneo coordinate efforts to achieve their public policy targets and allow a partial reallocation of planned land uses. We reveal the potential for Borneo to simultaneously retain ∼50% of its land as forests, protect adequate habitat for the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and Bornean elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis), and achieve an opportunity cost saving of over US$43 billion. Such coordination would depend on enhanced information sharing and reforms to land-use planning, which could be supported by the increasingly international nature of economies and conservation efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Context of Borneo.(a) Bornean states and the planned area for the Heart of Borneo initiative. (b) The opportunity cost (per hectare) of designating land as ‘Protected'. An opportunity cost layer was developed separately for each of the possible land uses. (c,d) The distribution of orangutan and elephant, respectively. (e) Current land use and land cover63. The orangutan distribution map is based on a predictive model54, and is continually updated as new information becomes available on the presence and absence of the species from different regions. For example, we note that in 2015–2016 additional surveys in Sarawak will be carried out by the Wildlife Conservation Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403346&req=5

f1: Context of Borneo.(a) Bornean states and the planned area for the Heart of Borneo initiative. (b) The opportunity cost (per hectare) of designating land as ‘Protected'. An opportunity cost layer was developed separately for each of the possible land uses. (c,d) The distribution of orangutan and elephant, respectively. (e) Current land use and land cover63. The orangutan distribution map is based on a predictive model54, and is continually updated as new information becomes available on the presence and absence of the species from different regions. For example, we note that in 2015–2016 additional surveys in Sarawak will be carried out by the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Mentions: The aspirations of the highest profile conservation initiative in Borneo (the Heart of Borneo) are reflected in scenario 3, with coordinated efforts focused on the mountainous and heavily forested interior of Borneo, and state-based planning outside of this core region (Figs 1a and 2c). This scenario incurs the greatest opportunity cost for meeting the policy targets, as 51% of land on Borneo would be required for protection or reduced-impact logging (Figs 3a and 4). While large tracts of land remain forested under this scenario, much of the lowland habitat for orangutan and elephant is converted to non-forest use, as these areas fall outside of the core region and existing protected areas (Figs 1 and 2). Despite these limitations, this scenario substantially improves on conservation targets relative to the baseline scenario (scenario 1), which could result in only 25% of land protected or managed for reduced-impact logging and the remainder being converted to non-forest use or conventional forestry (Fig. 4b).


Alternative futures for Borneo show the value of integrating economic and conservation targets across borders.

Runting RK, Meijaard E, Abram NK, Wells JA, Gaveau DL, Ancrenaz M, Posssingham HP, Wich SA, Ardiansyah F, Gumal MT, Ambu LN, Wilson KA - Nat Commun (2015)

Context of Borneo.(a) Bornean states and the planned area for the Heart of Borneo initiative. (b) The opportunity cost (per hectare) of designating land as ‘Protected'. An opportunity cost layer was developed separately for each of the possible land uses. (c,d) The distribution of orangutan and elephant, respectively. (e) Current land use and land cover63. The orangutan distribution map is based on a predictive model54, and is continually updated as new information becomes available on the presence and absence of the species from different regions. For example, we note that in 2015–2016 additional surveys in Sarawak will be carried out by the Wildlife Conservation Society.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403346&req=5

f1: Context of Borneo.(a) Bornean states and the planned area for the Heart of Borneo initiative. (b) The opportunity cost (per hectare) of designating land as ‘Protected'. An opportunity cost layer was developed separately for each of the possible land uses. (c,d) The distribution of orangutan and elephant, respectively. (e) Current land use and land cover63. The orangutan distribution map is based on a predictive model54, and is continually updated as new information becomes available on the presence and absence of the species from different regions. For example, we note that in 2015–2016 additional surveys in Sarawak will be carried out by the Wildlife Conservation Society.
Mentions: The aspirations of the highest profile conservation initiative in Borneo (the Heart of Borneo) are reflected in scenario 3, with coordinated efforts focused on the mountainous and heavily forested interior of Borneo, and state-based planning outside of this core region (Figs 1a and 2c). This scenario incurs the greatest opportunity cost for meeting the policy targets, as 51% of land on Borneo would be required for protection or reduced-impact logging (Figs 3a and 4). While large tracts of land remain forested under this scenario, much of the lowland habitat for orangutan and elephant is converted to non-forest use, as these areas fall outside of the core region and existing protected areas (Figs 1 and 2). Despite these limitations, this scenario substantially improves on conservation targets relative to the baseline scenario (scenario 1), which could result in only 25% of land protected or managed for reduced-impact logging and the remainder being converted to non-forest use or conventional forestry (Fig. 4b).

Bottom Line: We show what could be achieved if the three national jurisdictions of Borneo coordinate efforts to achieve their public policy targets and allow a partial reallocation of planned land uses.We reveal the potential for Borneo to simultaneously retain ∼50% of its land as forests, protect adequate habitat for the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and Bornean elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis), and achieve an opportunity cost saving of over US$43 billion.Such coordination would depend on enhanced information sharing and reforms to land-use planning, which could be supported by the increasingly international nature of economies and conservation efforts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Queensland, Australia [2] Borneo Futures Project, Country Woods 306, Jalan WR Supratman, Pondok Ranji-Rengas, Ciputat 15412, Tangerang, Indonesia [3] School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Balancing economic development with international commitments to protect biodiversity is a global challenge. Achieving this balance requires an understanding of the possible consequences of alternative future scenarios for a range of stakeholders. We employ an integrated economic and environmental planning approach to evaluate four alternative futures for the mega-diverse island of Borneo. We show what could be achieved if the three national jurisdictions of Borneo coordinate efforts to achieve their public policy targets and allow a partial reallocation of planned land uses. We reveal the potential for Borneo to simultaneously retain ∼50% of its land as forests, protect adequate habitat for the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) and Bornean elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis), and achieve an opportunity cost saving of over US$43 billion. Such coordination would depend on enhanced information sharing and reforms to land-use planning, which could be supported by the increasingly international nature of economies and conservation efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus