Limits...
The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions.

Mohammadi R, Hosseini-Safa A, Ehsani Ardakani MJ, Rostami-Nejad M - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries.Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS.Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host's immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries. Infectious agents can also suppress autoimmune and allergic disorders. Some investigations show that various protozoa and helminthes are connected with the main immune-mediated intestinal conditions including celiac disease (CD), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Celiac disease is a digestive and autoimmune disorder that can damage the small intestine and characterized by a multitude gastrointestinal (GI) and extra GI symptoms. IBD (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the small intestine and colon. The etiology of IBD is unknown, but it may be related to instability in the intestinal microflora that leading to an immoderate inflammatory response to commensal microbiota. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, long-term condition of the digestive system. Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS. Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host's immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD. The main objective of this review is to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasites and different inflammatory bowel disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Source: BMJ Publishing Ltd & British Society of Gastroenterology).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403024&req=5

Figure 3: Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Source: BMJ Publishing Ltd & British Society of Gastroenterology).

Mentions: IBD is an idiopathic, chronic, and recurring inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, which is represented principally by ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. Lately, the intestinal microbiota have been considered to be a significant factor in their etiology (7). UC is a worldwide chronic inflammatory disorder of the colon that causes typical ulcers in the mucosa of the rectum and colon (8). On the other hand, Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that can influence any part of the gut from mouth to anus (9). Methylated thiopurine metabolites, like 6-methyl mercaptopurine, are frequently used for the treatment of IBD (10). Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease has been shown in figure 3. IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder typically present with chronic abdominal pain and changed bowel habits (11). Recent investigation presented that IBS is characterized by meaningful alterations in the gut microflora (12). Many studies have shown that gastrointestinal infection is an important risk factor for the development of IBS (13, 14). IBS prevalence varied according to diagnostic criteria and geographic regions (figure 4).


The relationship between intestinal parasites and some immune-mediated intestinal conditions.

Mohammadi R, Hosseini-Safa A, Ehsani Ardakani MJ, Rostami-Nejad M - Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench (2015)

Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Source: BMJ Publishing Ltd & British Society of Gastroenterology).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4403024&req=5

Figure 3: Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Source: BMJ Publishing Ltd & British Society of Gastroenterology).
Mentions: IBD is an idiopathic, chronic, and recurring inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract, which is represented principally by ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. Lately, the intestinal microbiota have been considered to be a significant factor in their etiology (7). UC is a worldwide chronic inflammatory disorder of the colon that causes typical ulcers in the mucosa of the rectum and colon (8). On the other hand, Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition that can influence any part of the gut from mouth to anus (9). Methylated thiopurine metabolites, like 6-methyl mercaptopurine, are frequently used for the treatment of IBD (10). Global prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease has been shown in figure 3. IBS is a gastrointestinal disorder typically present with chronic abdominal pain and changed bowel habits (11). Recent investigation presented that IBS is characterized by meaningful alterations in the gut microflora (12). Many studies have shown that gastrointestinal infection is an important risk factor for the development of IBS (13, 14). IBS prevalence varied according to diagnostic criteria and geographic regions (figure 4).

Bottom Line: Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries.Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS.Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host's immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Over the last decades, the incidence of infestation by minor parasites has decreased in developed countries. Infectious agents can also suppress autoimmune and allergic disorders. Some investigations show that various protozoa and helminthes are connected with the main immune-mediated intestinal conditions including celiac disease (CD), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Celiac disease is a digestive and autoimmune disorder that can damage the small intestine and characterized by a multitude gastrointestinal (GI) and extra GI symptoms. IBD (including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) is a group of inflammatory conditions of the small intestine and colon. The etiology of IBD is unknown, but it may be related to instability in the intestinal microflora that leading to an immoderate inflammatory response to commensal microbiota. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, long-term condition of the digestive system. Bloating, diarrhoea and/or constipation are nonspecific symptoms of IBS. Various studies have shown that some intestinal parasites can effect on immune system of infected hosts and in some cases, they are able to modify and change the host's immune responses, particularly in autoimmune disorders like celiac disease and IBD. The main objective of this review is to investigate the relationship between intestinal parasites and different inflammatory bowel disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus