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Detection of HPV-associated oropharyngeal tumours in a 16-year cohort: more than meets the eye.

Melchers LJ, Mastik MF, Samaniego Cameron B, van Dijk BA, de Bock GH, van der Laan BF, van der Vegt B, Speel EJ, Roodenburg JL, Witjes MJ, Schuuring E - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Brightfield in situ hybridisation did not identify additional HPV-positive cases.Human papilloma virus-associated tumour proportion increased from 13% (1997-2004) to 30% (2005-2012).In our cohort, the incidence of HPV-associated OpSCC is low but increasing rapidly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands [2] Department of Pathology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Accurate assessment of the prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in oropharyngeal tumours (OpSCC) is important because HPV-positive OpSCC are consistently associated with an improved overall survival. Recently, an algorithm has become available that reliably detects clinically relevant HPV in tumour tissue, however, no complete cohorts have been tested. The aim was to determine the prevalence of active high-risk HPV infection in a complete cohort of OpSCC collected over a 16-year period.

Methods: Using a triple algorithm of p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV-BRISH and HPV-PCR, we assessed the prevalence of active HPV infection in all OpSCC diagnosed in our hospital from 1997 to 2012 (n=193) and a random selection of 200 oral tumours (OSCC).

Results: Forty-seven OpSCC (24%) were HPVGP PCR-positive; 42 cases were HPV16+, 1 HPV18+, 3 HPV33+ and 1 HPV35+. Brightfield in situ hybridisation did not identify additional HPV-positive cases. Human papilloma virus-associated tumour proportion increased from 13% (1997-2004) to 30% (2005-2012). Human papilloma virus-positivity was an independent predictor for longer disease-specific survival (HR=0.22; 95%CI:0.10-0.47). Only one OSCC was HPV+.

Conclusions: In our cohort, the incidence of HPV-associated OpSCC is low but increasing rapidly. The strict detection algorithm, analysis of disease-specific survival and the complete cohort, including palliatively treated patients, may influence the reported prevalence and prognostic value of HPV in OpSCC.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

HPV trends in OpSCC. Percentage of HPV+ OpSCC per 2-year period and the trend line (dashed). Absolute numbers of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases per period are indicated below the graph.
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fig3: HPV trends in OpSCC. Percentage of HPV+ OpSCC per 2-year period and the trend line (dashed). Absolute numbers of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases per period are indicated below the graph.

Mentions: The overall proportion of active high-risk HPV infection in tonsillar and base-of-tongue tumours during our study period 1997–2012 was 24%. Notably, the proportion of HPV-positive tumours increased from 13% (8/62) during the first half (1997–2004) to 30% (39/131) during the second half (2005–2012) of the study period. There was a significant increase of both the absolute number as well as the proportion of HPV-positive tumours throughout the research period (P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively; Figure 3).


Detection of HPV-associated oropharyngeal tumours in a 16-year cohort: more than meets the eye.

Melchers LJ, Mastik MF, Samaniego Cameron B, van Dijk BA, de Bock GH, van der Laan BF, van der Vegt B, Speel EJ, Roodenburg JL, Witjes MJ, Schuuring E - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

HPV trends in OpSCC. Percentage of HPV+ OpSCC per 2-year period and the trend line (dashed). Absolute numbers of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases per period are indicated below the graph.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402463&req=5

fig3: HPV trends in OpSCC. Percentage of HPV+ OpSCC per 2-year period and the trend line (dashed). Absolute numbers of HPV-positive and HPV-negative cases per period are indicated below the graph.
Mentions: The overall proportion of active high-risk HPV infection in tonsillar and base-of-tongue tumours during our study period 1997–2012 was 24%. Notably, the proportion of HPV-positive tumours increased from 13% (8/62) during the first half (1997–2004) to 30% (39/131) during the second half (2005–2012) of the study period. There was a significant increase of both the absolute number as well as the proportion of HPV-positive tumours throughout the research period (P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively; Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Brightfield in situ hybridisation did not identify additional HPV-positive cases.Human papilloma virus-associated tumour proportion increased from 13% (1997-2004) to 30% (2005-2012).In our cohort, the incidence of HPV-associated OpSCC is low but increasing rapidly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands [2] Department of Pathology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700RB Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Accurate assessment of the prevalence of the human papilloma virus (HPV) in oropharyngeal tumours (OpSCC) is important because HPV-positive OpSCC are consistently associated with an improved overall survival. Recently, an algorithm has become available that reliably detects clinically relevant HPV in tumour tissue, however, no complete cohorts have been tested. The aim was to determine the prevalence of active high-risk HPV infection in a complete cohort of OpSCC collected over a 16-year period.

Methods: Using a triple algorithm of p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV-BRISH and HPV-PCR, we assessed the prevalence of active HPV infection in all OpSCC diagnosed in our hospital from 1997 to 2012 (n=193) and a random selection of 200 oral tumours (OSCC).

Results: Forty-seven OpSCC (24%) were HPVGP PCR-positive; 42 cases were HPV16+, 1 HPV18+, 3 HPV33+ and 1 HPV35+. Brightfield in situ hybridisation did not identify additional HPV-positive cases. Human papilloma virus-associated tumour proportion increased from 13% (1997-2004) to 30% (2005-2012). Human papilloma virus-positivity was an independent predictor for longer disease-specific survival (HR=0.22; 95%CI:0.10-0.47). Only one OSCC was HPV+.

Conclusions: In our cohort, the incidence of HPV-associated OpSCC is low but increasing rapidly. The strict detection algorithm, analysis of disease-specific survival and the complete cohort, including palliatively treated patients, may influence the reported prevalence and prognostic value of HPV in OpSCC.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus