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A view on dendritic cell immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: how far have we come?

Coosemans A, Baert T, Vergote I - Facts Views Vis Obgyn (2015)

Bottom Line: Ovarian cancer is the second most important pelvic gynaecologic malignancy and nowadays still kills 80% of patients.New treatment options are mandatory.Although it has been shown that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic tumor, the possibility of developing immunotherapy has been neglected for a long time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; UZ Leuven, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Ovarian cancer is the second most important pelvic gynaecologic malignancy and nowadays still kills 80% of patients. New treatment options are mandatory. Although it has been shown that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic tumor, the possibility of developing immunotherapy has been neglected for a long time. This article focuses on the importance of the immune system in the development and progression of cancer and the possibilities and problems of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy to influence the immune system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic picture of the immune balance during cancer development and the effect that is hoped for by immunotherapy.
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Figure 1: Schematic picture of the immune balance during cancer development and the effect that is hoped for by immunotherapy.

Mentions: DC immunotherapy is an attempt to increase the number of efficient DCm (and consequently tumor-specific T cells) in order to shift the balance from immunosuppression towards immune surveillance or to reprogram the immune system away from the ‘escape’ phase towards the equilibrium or elimination phase (Fig. 1) (Gilboa, 2007). Although some reports are now being published on augmenting the already existing DC in the body, ex vivo DC culturing is nowadays still the state-of-the-art. Ex vivo DC immunotherapy can schematically be presented as shown in Figure 2. It is a laboratory process, starting from the patient’s own white blood cells. However, several variations are possible at each step of the process. Table I gives an overview of possible variations. Until now, none of them has clearly shown to be superior to the others, therefore, there is no international consensus in how to culture and inject DCm. Also, there is no agreement on the number of DCm that have to be injected and at what frequency.


A view on dendritic cell immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: how far have we come?

Coosemans A, Baert T, Vergote I - Facts Views Vis Obgyn (2015)

Schematic picture of the immune balance during cancer development and the effect that is hoped for by immunotherapy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402447&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic picture of the immune balance during cancer development and the effect that is hoped for by immunotherapy.
Mentions: DC immunotherapy is an attempt to increase the number of efficient DCm (and consequently tumor-specific T cells) in order to shift the balance from immunosuppression towards immune surveillance or to reprogram the immune system away from the ‘escape’ phase towards the equilibrium or elimination phase (Fig. 1) (Gilboa, 2007). Although some reports are now being published on augmenting the already existing DC in the body, ex vivo DC culturing is nowadays still the state-of-the-art. Ex vivo DC immunotherapy can schematically be presented as shown in Figure 2. It is a laboratory process, starting from the patient’s own white blood cells. However, several variations are possible at each step of the process. Table I gives an overview of possible variations. Until now, none of them has clearly shown to be superior to the others, therefore, there is no international consensus in how to culture and inject DCm. Also, there is no agreement on the number of DCm that have to be injected and at what frequency.

Bottom Line: Ovarian cancer is the second most important pelvic gynaecologic malignancy and nowadays still kills 80% of patients.New treatment options are mandatory.Although it has been shown that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic tumor, the possibility of developing immunotherapy has been neglected for a long time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; UZ Leuven, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
Ovarian cancer is the second most important pelvic gynaecologic malignancy and nowadays still kills 80% of patients. New treatment options are mandatory. Although it has been shown that ovarian cancer is an immunogenic tumor, the possibility of developing immunotherapy has been neglected for a long time. This article focuses on the importance of the immune system in the development and progression of cancer and the possibilities and problems of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy to influence the immune system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus