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Where have all the tadpoles gone? Individual genetic tracking of amphibian larvae until adulthood.

Ringler E, Mangione R, Ringler M - Mol Ecol Resour (2014)

Bottom Line: We found large differences in the identification success of the programs tested.Our results demonstrate that microsatellite markers are a highly powerful tool for studying amphibian populations on an individual basis.The ability to individually track amphibian tadpoles throughout metamorphosis until adulthood will be of substantial value for future studies on amphibian population ecology and evolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, Vienna, A-1090, Austria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of corresponding juvenile (left) and adult (right) ventral patterns in one Allobates femoralis individual.
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Figure 1: Example of corresponding juvenile (left) and adult (right) ventral patterns in one Allobates femoralis individual.

Mentions: For this study, we used samples of Allobates femoralis, a small diurnal poison frog (Dendrobatidae) that occurs over entire Amazonia, which were collected in the course of a long-term study on juvenile dispersal patterns and general population ecology in this species. Allobates femoralis is characterized by male territoriality, female site fidelity, a prolonged breeding period, a polygynandrous mating system and male tadpole transport to water bodies (Roithmair 1992; Ringler et al. 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013a; Montanarin et al. 2011). Adult individuals can be distinguished via unique ventral patterns that are already present in juvenile individuals from approximately 6 months of age on (see Fig. 1). A large number of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers are already available for this species (Jehle et al. 2008; Ursprung et al. 2011a; Ringler et al. 2013b).


Where have all the tadpoles gone? Individual genetic tracking of amphibian larvae until adulthood.

Ringler E, Mangione R, Ringler M - Mol Ecol Resour (2014)

Example of corresponding juvenile (left) and adult (right) ventral patterns in one Allobates femoralis individual.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402230&req=5

Figure 1: Example of corresponding juvenile (left) and adult (right) ventral patterns in one Allobates femoralis individual.
Mentions: For this study, we used samples of Allobates femoralis, a small diurnal poison frog (Dendrobatidae) that occurs over entire Amazonia, which were collected in the course of a long-term study on juvenile dispersal patterns and general population ecology in this species. Allobates femoralis is characterized by male territoriality, female site fidelity, a prolonged breeding period, a polygynandrous mating system and male tadpole transport to water bodies (Roithmair 1992; Ringler et al. 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013a; Montanarin et al. 2011). Adult individuals can be distinguished via unique ventral patterns that are already present in juvenile individuals from approximately 6 months of age on (see Fig. 1). A large number of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers are already available for this species (Jehle et al. 2008; Ursprung et al. 2011a; Ringler et al. 2013b).

Bottom Line: We found large differences in the identification success of the programs tested.Our results demonstrate that microsatellite markers are a highly powerful tool for studying amphibian populations on an individual basis.The ability to individually track amphibian tadpoles throughout metamorphosis until adulthood will be of substantial value for future studies on amphibian population ecology and evolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, Vienna, A-1090, Austria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus