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Perceptions and realities for distal freehand interlocking of intramedullary nails.

Ostrum RF - Adv Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: Fellowship trained surgeons were 60% less likely to find DFHI difficult when compared to nonfellowship surgeons and surgeons with residents were 76% less likely to perceive DFHI as difficult than surgeons without residents.In all groups, 40-43% of surgeons used distal interlocking based on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.Forty percent of surgeons based their usage of DFHI screws on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of North Carolina, 3160 Bioinformatics Building, CB 7055, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

ABSTRACT
There is a perception that distal freehand interlocking (DFHI) of intramedullary nails can be difficult and time consuming. This study consists of a survey of surgeons' practices for DFHI screws and their reasons for not using this technique. A survey was sent to 1400 orthopaedic surgeons who were asked to agree or disagree with statements regarding the difficulty and indications for the usage of distal freehand interlocking screws. The results were analyzed by practice demographics, resident availability, and completion of an orthopaedic trauma fellowship. Overall, 316 surgeons (22.6%) responded to the survey. Fellowship trained surgeons were 60% less likely to find DFHI difficult when compared to nonfellowship surgeons and surgeons with residents were 76% less likely to perceive DFHI as difficult than surgeons without residents. In all groups, 40-43% of surgeons used distal interlocking based on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern. Distal freehand interlocking is perceived as difficult by community orthopaedic surgeons without residents and surgeons who have not done an orthopaedic trauma fellowship. Forty percent of surgeons based their usage of DFHI screws on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent agreement comparison of fellowship and nonfellowship trained orthopaedic surgeons.
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fig1: Percent agreement comparison of fellowship and nonfellowship trained orthopaedic surgeons.

Mentions: An anonymous, voluntary survey was sent out to 1400 orthopaedic surgeons through an Internet link via SurveyMonkey (https://www.surveymonkey.com/) to the Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Society, New Jersey Orthopaedic Society, and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. There were a total of 316 (22.6%) responses received out of the approximately 1400 surveys that were sent. The survey included the following: (1) the utilization of distal, freehand interlocking screws can be difficult and is often time consuming; (2) the use of distal, freehand interlocking screws is an easy, learnable technique; (3) my choice to use distal, freehand interlocking screws is based on my comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern. Demographic data was collected on the respondents that included their extent of orthopaedic training, that is, those who had done an orthopaedic trauma fellowship (WF) and those who did not have a fellowship (NF) (Figure 1). Further, the type of practice was recorded and categorized into the following: those surgeons practicing in the community with residents (CWR), those community surgeons without residents (CNR), and those in academic practice with residents (AWR) (Figures 2 and 3). Responses were analyzed by Pearson X2 or Fisher exact test in accordance with distributional assumptions and filtered by the type of practice and presence or absence of trauma fellowship. Separate multiple logistic regression models were fit to utilization of distal freehand interlocking screws, ease of the DFHI technique, and choice to use distal freehand interlocking screws.


Perceptions and realities for distal freehand interlocking of intramedullary nails.

Ostrum RF - Adv Orthop (2015)

Percent agreement comparison of fellowship and nonfellowship trained orthopaedic surgeons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402206&req=5

fig1: Percent agreement comparison of fellowship and nonfellowship trained orthopaedic surgeons.
Mentions: An anonymous, voluntary survey was sent out to 1400 orthopaedic surgeons through an Internet link via SurveyMonkey (https://www.surveymonkey.com/) to the Pennsylvania Orthopaedic Society, New Jersey Orthopaedic Society, and the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. There were a total of 316 (22.6%) responses received out of the approximately 1400 surveys that were sent. The survey included the following: (1) the utilization of distal, freehand interlocking screws can be difficult and is often time consuming; (2) the use of distal, freehand interlocking screws is an easy, learnable technique; (3) my choice to use distal, freehand interlocking screws is based on my comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern. Demographic data was collected on the respondents that included their extent of orthopaedic training, that is, those who had done an orthopaedic trauma fellowship (WF) and those who did not have a fellowship (NF) (Figure 1). Further, the type of practice was recorded and categorized into the following: those surgeons practicing in the community with residents (CWR), those community surgeons without residents (CNR), and those in academic practice with residents (AWR) (Figures 2 and 3). Responses were analyzed by Pearson X2 or Fisher exact test in accordance with distributional assumptions and filtered by the type of practice and presence or absence of trauma fellowship. Separate multiple logistic regression models were fit to utilization of distal freehand interlocking screws, ease of the DFHI technique, and choice to use distal freehand interlocking screws.

Bottom Line: Fellowship trained surgeons were 60% less likely to find DFHI difficult when compared to nonfellowship surgeons and surgeons with residents were 76% less likely to perceive DFHI as difficult than surgeons without residents.In all groups, 40-43% of surgeons used distal interlocking based on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.Forty percent of surgeons based their usage of DFHI screws on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of North Carolina, 3160 Bioinformatics Building, CB 7055, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

ABSTRACT
There is a perception that distal freehand interlocking (DFHI) of intramedullary nails can be difficult and time consuming. This study consists of a survey of surgeons' practices for DFHI screws and their reasons for not using this technique. A survey was sent to 1400 orthopaedic surgeons who were asked to agree or disagree with statements regarding the difficulty and indications for the usage of distal freehand interlocking screws. The results were analyzed by practice demographics, resident availability, and completion of an orthopaedic trauma fellowship. Overall, 316 surgeons (22.6%) responded to the survey. Fellowship trained surgeons were 60% less likely to find DFHI difficult when compared to nonfellowship surgeons and surgeons with residents were 76% less likely to perceive DFHI as difficult than surgeons without residents. In all groups, 40-43% of surgeons used distal interlocking based on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern. Distal freehand interlocking is perceived as difficult by community orthopaedic surgeons without residents and surgeons who have not done an orthopaedic trauma fellowship. Forty percent of surgeons based their usage of DFHI screws on their comfort with the technique and not the fracture pattern.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus