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Iron Accumulation Is Not Homogenous among Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

Dashtipour K, Liu M, Kani C, Dalaie P, Obenaus A, Simmons D, Gatto NM, Zarifi M - Parkinsons Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusions.To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Iron is considered to lead to neurodegeneration and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a powerful tool to measure phase related iron content of brain. Methods. Twelve de novo patients with PD were recruited from the Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Loma Linda University. Twelve age- and sex-matched non-PD subjects were recruited from neurology clinic as controls. Using SWI, the phase related iron content was estimated from different brain regions of interest (ROIs). Results. There was a trend between increasing age and iron accumulation in the globus pallidus and putamen in all subjects. Iron accumulation was not significant in different ROIs in PD patients compared to controls after adjustment for age. Our data revealed heterogeneity of phase values in different brain ROIs among all subjects with an exaggerated trend at SN in PD patients. Conclusions. Our data suggest a nonhomogeneous pattern of iron accumulation in different brain regions among PD patients. Further studies are needed to explore whether this may correlate to the progression of PD. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regions of interest drawn on SWI: CN (a), PUT (b), GP (c), RN (d), SN (e), caudal SN (f), THA (g), and DN (h). CN: caudate nucleus, PUT: putamen, GP: globus pallidus, RN: red nucleus, SN: substantia nigra, caudal SN: caudal substantia nigra, THA: thalamus, and DN: dentate nucleus.
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fig1: Regions of interest drawn on SWI: CN (a), PUT (b), GP (c), RN (d), SN (e), caudal SN (f), THA (g), and DN (h). CN: caudate nucleus, PUT: putamen, GP: globus pallidus, RN: red nucleus, SN: substantia nigra, caudal SN: caudal substantia nigra, THA: thalamus, and DN: dentate nucleus.

Mentions: Two independent investigators blinded to patient or control status drew the ROIs (Figure 1). The SN was identified on the third slice caudally, after the appearance of the red nucleus. For the SN, two areas were drawn: the entire SN overall and the caudal SN. Gray matter (GM) was identified as motor cortex and the white matter (WM) was identified as areas adjacent to the gray matter. For red nucleus (RN), putamen (PUT), globus pallidus (GP), caudate nucleus (CN), dentate nucleus (DN), and thalamus (THA), the optimum slice was selected with reference to standard neuroanatomic criteria [27].


Iron Accumulation Is Not Homogenous among Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

Dashtipour K, Liu M, Kani C, Dalaie P, Obenaus A, Simmons D, Gatto NM, Zarifi M - Parkinsons Dis (2015)

Regions of interest drawn on SWI: CN (a), PUT (b), GP (c), RN (d), SN (e), caudal SN (f), THA (g), and DN (h). CN: caudate nucleus, PUT: putamen, GP: globus pallidus, RN: red nucleus, SN: substantia nigra, caudal SN: caudal substantia nigra, THA: thalamus, and DN: dentate nucleus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402185&req=5

fig1: Regions of interest drawn on SWI: CN (a), PUT (b), GP (c), RN (d), SN (e), caudal SN (f), THA (g), and DN (h). CN: caudate nucleus, PUT: putamen, GP: globus pallidus, RN: red nucleus, SN: substantia nigra, caudal SN: caudal substantia nigra, THA: thalamus, and DN: dentate nucleus.
Mentions: Two independent investigators blinded to patient or control status drew the ROIs (Figure 1). The SN was identified on the third slice caudally, after the appearance of the red nucleus. For the SN, two areas were drawn: the entire SN overall and the caudal SN. Gray matter (GM) was identified as motor cortex and the white matter (WM) was identified as areas adjacent to the gray matter. For red nucleus (RN), putamen (PUT), globus pallidus (GP), caudate nucleus (CN), dentate nucleus (DN), and thalamus (THA), the optimum slice was selected with reference to standard neuroanatomic criteria [27].

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusions.To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Iron is considered to lead to neurodegeneration and has been hypothesized as a possible cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a powerful tool to measure phase related iron content of brain. Methods. Twelve de novo patients with PD were recruited from the Movement Disorders Clinic, Department of Neurology, Loma Linda University. Twelve age- and sex-matched non-PD subjects were recruited from neurology clinic as controls. Using SWI, the phase related iron content was estimated from different brain regions of interest (ROIs). Results. There was a trend between increasing age and iron accumulation in the globus pallidus and putamen in all subjects. Iron accumulation was not significant in different ROIs in PD patients compared to controls after adjustment for age. Our data revealed heterogeneity of phase values in different brain ROIs among all subjects with an exaggerated trend at SN in PD patients. Conclusions. Our data suggest a nonhomogeneous pattern of iron accumulation in different brain regions among PD patients. Further studies are needed to explore whether this may correlate to the progression of PD. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the heterogeneity of iron accumulation in the brain, among patients with PD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus