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Risk of second malignancies in patients with early-stage classical Hodgkin's lymphoma treated in a modern era.

LeMieux MH, Solanki AA, Mahmood U, Chmura SJ, Koshy M - Cancer Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The study cohort included 8807 patients.Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 7.2 years (range: 0-22).Further studies, with longer follow-up of patients treated in the modern era are needed to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

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Freedom from second malignancy (FFSM). FFSM in patients diagnosed in 1988–1999 versus 2000–2009.
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fig01: Freedom from second malignancy (FFSM). FFSM in patients diagnosed in 1988–1999 versus 2000–2009.

Mentions: UVA revealed treatment in 2000 or later (P = 0.04), younger age at diagnosis (P < 0.001), and stage II (P < 0.01) were associated with improved FFSM (Table2). The 5 year FFSM for patients treated from 1988 to 1999 was 96.6% versus 97.1% for patients treated from 2000 to 2009, and 93.0% versus 95.1% at 10 years (P = 0.04) (Figure1). On multivariate analysis, treatment before 2000 (P = 0.02) and older age (36 years and older) (P < 0.01) was associated with a worse FFSM, with a trend toward worse FFSM for females (P = 0.08) (Table3).


Risk of second malignancies in patients with early-stage classical Hodgkin's lymphoma treated in a modern era.

LeMieux MH, Solanki AA, Mahmood U, Chmura SJ, Koshy M - Cancer Med (2015)

Freedom from second malignancy (FFSM). FFSM in patients diagnosed in 1988–1999 versus 2000–2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4402065&req=5

fig01: Freedom from second malignancy (FFSM). FFSM in patients diagnosed in 1988–1999 versus 2000–2009.
Mentions: UVA revealed treatment in 2000 or later (P = 0.04), younger age at diagnosis (P < 0.001), and stage II (P < 0.01) were associated with improved FFSM (Table2). The 5 year FFSM for patients treated from 1988 to 1999 was 96.6% versus 97.1% for patients treated from 2000 to 2009, and 93.0% versus 95.1% at 10 years (P = 0.04) (Figure1). On multivariate analysis, treatment before 2000 (P = 0.02) and older age (36 years and older) (P < 0.01) was associated with a worse FFSM, with a trend toward worse FFSM for females (P = 0.08) (Table3).

Bottom Line: The study cohort included 8807 patients.Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 7.2 years (range: 0-22).Further studies, with longer follow-up of patients treated in the modern era are needed to confirm these findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus