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Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in Some Egyptian Water Systems and Its Incidence of Transmission to Individuals.

El-Sharouny E, El-Shazli H, Olama Z - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Two samples, belonging to Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, showed positive results for presence of H. pylori.These two samples gave a positive result for the second time, on applying PCR technique for the cultures isolated under microaeroplilic conditions.In developing countries such as Egypt, there is a big possibility for H. pylori to be transmitted via drinking water, hence, causing an epidemic infection, particularly in dense populated areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: The current study aimed to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in some water systems in Egypt as well as in blood samples of patients suffering from stomach ulcers.

Methods: Fifty-one water samples collected from some Egyptian governorates; Giza, Alexandria, Monofia, Beheira, Minya, Sohag, was subjected to physical and chemical analysis. Urease gene ureC, a highly specific sequence in H. pylori DNA was tracked in tested water samples and then in blood samples of patients' resident in areas with infected water supply using PCR technique. Data were all fed to the computer using IBM SPSS software package version 20.0. Qualitative data were described using number and percent. Comparison between different groups regarding categorical variables was tested using Chi-square test.

Results: Two samples, belonging to Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, showed positive results for presence of H. pylori. These two samples gave a positive result for the second time, on applying PCR technique for the cultures isolated under microaeroplilic conditions. Blood samples (173) were withdrawn from individuals living in the two areas with infected water supply. As diagnosed by ELISA, positive tests for H. pylori were recorded in 33.3% and 33.8% of patients suffering from ulcers in Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, respectively.

Conclusion: In developing countries such as Egypt, there is a big possibility for H. pylori to be transmitted via drinking water, hence, causing an epidemic infection, particularly in dense populated areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A map illustrating the Egyptian districts under study
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Figure 1: A map illustrating the Egyptian districts under study

Mentions: The study was conducted in six governorates in Egypt (Fig. 1). All characterized by dense population and high incidence of gastric disease and cancer (12–14). The geographic variation of studied areas is believed to be largely socioeconomic. The source of drinking water for all of them is the River Nile or its branches, except for Abu El Matamir-Beheira and Al Sadat-Monofia. A brief illustration for each studied area is as follows:


Detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA in Some Egyptian Water Systems and Its Incidence of Transmission to Individuals.

El-Sharouny E, El-Shazli H, Olama Z - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

A map illustrating the Egyptian districts under study
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401878&req=5

Figure 1: A map illustrating the Egyptian districts under study
Mentions: The study was conducted in six governorates in Egypt (Fig. 1). All characterized by dense population and high incidence of gastric disease and cancer (12–14). The geographic variation of studied areas is believed to be largely socioeconomic. The source of drinking water for all of them is the River Nile or its branches, except for Abu El Matamir-Beheira and Al Sadat-Monofia. A brief illustration for each studied area is as follows:

Bottom Line: Two samples, belonging to Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, showed positive results for presence of H. pylori.These two samples gave a positive result for the second time, on applying PCR technique for the cultures isolated under microaeroplilic conditions.In developing countries such as Egypt, there is a big possibility for H. pylori to be transmitted via drinking water, hence, causing an epidemic infection, particularly in dense populated areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Botany and Microbiology Department, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: The current study aimed to detect the presence of Helicobacter pylori in some water systems in Egypt as well as in blood samples of patients suffering from stomach ulcers.

Methods: Fifty-one water samples collected from some Egyptian governorates; Giza, Alexandria, Monofia, Beheira, Minya, Sohag, was subjected to physical and chemical analysis. Urease gene ureC, a highly specific sequence in H. pylori DNA was tracked in tested water samples and then in blood samples of patients' resident in areas with infected water supply using PCR technique. Data were all fed to the computer using IBM SPSS software package version 20.0. Qualitative data were described using number and percent. Comparison between different groups regarding categorical variables was tested using Chi-square test.

Results: Two samples, belonging to Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, showed positive results for presence of H. pylori. These two samples gave a positive result for the second time, on applying PCR technique for the cultures isolated under microaeroplilic conditions. Blood samples (173) were withdrawn from individuals living in the two areas with infected water supply. As diagnosed by ELISA, positive tests for H. pylori were recorded in 33.3% and 33.8% of patients suffering from ulcers in Abu El Matamir-Beheira, and Sidi Bishr-Alexandria, respectively.

Conclusion: In developing countries such as Egypt, there is a big possibility for H. pylori to be transmitted via drinking water, hence, causing an epidemic infection, particularly in dense populated areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus