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Multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation among high-cost patients in the US Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

Zulman DM, Pal Chee C, Wagner TH, Yoon J, Cohen DM, Holmes TH, Ritchie C, Asch SM - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Multimorbidity was generally associated with greater outpatient and inpatient utilisation.However, increased multisystem multimorbidity was associated with a higher outpatient share of total costs (1.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01) but a lower inpatient share of total costs (-0.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01).Multisystem multimorbidity is common among high-cost VA patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Innovation to Implementation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California, USA Division of General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Variation in number of comorbidities among high-cost Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with common medical and mental health conditions (PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder).
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BMJOPEN2015007771F2: Variation in number of comorbidities among high-cost Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with common medical and mental health conditions (PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder).

Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates multimorbidity rates among patients with the five most common medical and five most common mental health conditions. For the majority of specified conditions, as many as two-thirds of affected patients had ≥5 total comorbidities. For certain conditions, however, such as cancer and schizophrenia, fewer than half of the affected patients had this level of multimorbidity. Among patients with cancer and schizophrenia, 22% and 18% had no more than one comorbid condition, respectively. In contrast, among patients with all other conditions listed, only 5–11% of affected patients had no more than one comorbid condition.


Multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation among high-cost patients in the US Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

Zulman DM, Pal Chee C, Wagner TH, Yoon J, Cohen DM, Holmes TH, Ritchie C, Asch SM - BMJ Open (2015)

Variation in number of comorbidities among high-cost Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with common medical and mental health conditions (PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401870&req=5

BMJOPEN2015007771F2: Variation in number of comorbidities among high-cost Veterans Affairs (VA) patients with common medical and mental health conditions (PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder).
Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates multimorbidity rates among patients with the five most common medical and five most common mental health conditions. For the majority of specified conditions, as many as two-thirds of affected patients had ≥5 total comorbidities. For certain conditions, however, such as cancer and schizophrenia, fewer than half of the affected patients had this level of multimorbidity. Among patients with cancer and schizophrenia, 22% and 18% had no more than one comorbid condition, respectively. In contrast, among patients with all other conditions listed, only 5–11% of affected patients had no more than one comorbid condition.

Bottom Line: Multimorbidity was generally associated with greater outpatient and inpatient utilisation.However, increased multisystem multimorbidity was associated with a higher outpatient share of total costs (1.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01) but a lower inpatient share of total costs (-0.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01).Multisystem multimorbidity is common among high-cost VA patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Innovation to Implementation, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California, USA Division of General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus