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The effectiveness of toolkits as knowledge translation strategies for integrating evidence into clinical care: a systematic review.

Yamada J, Shorkey A, Barwick M, Widger K, Stevens BJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of a toolkit to support the integration of evidence into clinical care, and if the KT goal(s) of the study were to inform, share knowledge, build awareness, change practice, change behaviour, and/or clinical outcomes in healthcare settings, inform policy, or to commercialise an innovation.Six of the eight toolkits were partially or mostly effective in changing clinical outcomes and six studies reported on implementation outcomes.Future toolkits should be informed by high-quality evidence and theory, and should be evaluated using rigorous study designs to explain the factors underlying their effectiveness and successful implementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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Study selection flow chart.
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BMJOPEN2014006808F1: Study selection flow chart.

Mentions: The search strategy yielded 39 unique studies for inclusion in this review1121–58 (figure 1). Given the diversity of studies in terms of participants and outcomes, a meta-analysis was not possible; therefore, we chose to report on all studies with a strong or moderate global ratings rather than focusing only on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of potentially weak quality.


The effectiveness of toolkits as knowledge translation strategies for integrating evidence into clinical care: a systematic review.

Yamada J, Shorkey A, Barwick M, Widger K, Stevens BJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Study selection flow chart.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401869&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006808F1: Study selection flow chart.
Mentions: The search strategy yielded 39 unique studies for inclusion in this review1121–58 (figure 1). Given the diversity of studies in terms of participants and outcomes, a meta-analysis was not possible; therefore, we chose to report on all studies with a strong or moderate global ratings rather than focusing only on randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of potentially weak quality.

Bottom Line: Studies were included if they evaluated the effectiveness of a toolkit to support the integration of evidence into clinical care, and if the KT goal(s) of the study were to inform, share knowledge, build awareness, change practice, change behaviour, and/or clinical outcomes in healthcare settings, inform policy, or to commercialise an innovation.Six of the eight toolkits were partially or mostly effective in changing clinical outcomes and six studies reported on implementation outcomes.Future toolkits should be informed by high-quality evidence and theory, and should be evaluated using rigorous study designs to explain the factors underlying their effectiveness and successful implementation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Show MeSH