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Patterns and correlates of physical activity behaviour over 10 years in older adults: prospective analyses from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

Smith L, Gardner B, Fisher A, Hamer M - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: There was an overall trend for increasing levels of inactivity and a reduction in vigorous activity.Those with greater wealth were 4 times more likely to be persistently active.A range of sociodemographic and biomedical factors were associated with being persistently active in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, London, UK.

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Patterns in physical activity behaviour across 10 years (2002–2012) in older adults (n=5022).
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BMJOPEN2014007423F1: Patterns in physical activity behaviour across 10 years (2002–2012) in older adults (n=5022).

Mentions: At baseline, 5.7% of the sample reported no regular physical activity, 11.1% reported only light activity at least once a week, and moderate and vigorous intensity activity was reported in 48.8% and 34.4%, respectively. There was reasonable stability in the physical activity measure over the six waves of assessment (Cronbach's α=0.85). However, there was an overall trend for increasing levels of inactivity and a reduction in vigorous activity (see figure 1). Just under half (49%) of the sample were defined as persistently active (reporting moderate and/or vigorous physical activity at least once a week over all 6 assessment points); 3.7% could be defined as persistently low active (inactive or only light activity over all 6 assessment points); the remainder were inconsistent and fluctuated between the different physical activity categories. The persistently active tended to be younger, employed, more likely to be men and in the highest wealth quintile, less likely to have smoked, have depressive symptoms, a long-standing illness or obesity (see table 1).


Patterns and correlates of physical activity behaviour over 10 years in older adults: prospective analyses from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

Smith L, Gardner B, Fisher A, Hamer M - BMJ Open (2015)

Patterns in physical activity behaviour across 10 years (2002–2012) in older adults (n=5022).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401868&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007423F1: Patterns in physical activity behaviour across 10 years (2002–2012) in older adults (n=5022).
Mentions: At baseline, 5.7% of the sample reported no regular physical activity, 11.1% reported only light activity at least once a week, and moderate and vigorous intensity activity was reported in 48.8% and 34.4%, respectively. There was reasonable stability in the physical activity measure over the six waves of assessment (Cronbach's α=0.85). However, there was an overall trend for increasing levels of inactivity and a reduction in vigorous activity (see figure 1). Just under half (49%) of the sample were defined as persistently active (reporting moderate and/or vigorous physical activity at least once a week over all 6 assessment points); 3.7% could be defined as persistently low active (inactive or only light activity over all 6 assessment points); the remainder were inconsistent and fluctuated between the different physical activity categories. The persistently active tended to be younger, employed, more likely to be men and in the highest wealth quintile, less likely to have smoked, have depressive symptoms, a long-standing illness or obesity (see table 1).

Bottom Line: There was an overall trend for increasing levels of inactivity and a reduction in vigorous activity.Those with greater wealth were 4 times more likely to be persistently active.A range of sociodemographic and biomedical factors were associated with being persistently active in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus