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Quitting experiences and preferences for a future quit attempt: a study among inpatient smokers.

Thomas D, Abramson MJ, Bonevski B, Taylor S, Poole SG, Weeks GR, Dooley MJ, George J - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Understanding smokers' quit experiences and their preferences for a future quit attempt may aid in the development of effective cessation treatments.The majority of smokers had attempted quitting in the previous 12 months; NRT was a popular cessation treatment, although it was not used as recommended by most.This suggests a need for assistance in the selection and optimal use of cessation aids for hospitalised smokers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram outlining patient recruitment.
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BMJOPEN2014006959F1: Diagram outlining patient recruitment.

Mentions: The mean participation rate in the RCT was 42.8% across the three sites (participation rates at the individual hospitals ranged from 35.4% to 49.6%) giving a final sample size of 600 participants (figure 1). Non-participants were more likely to be light smokers (72.0% vs 52.7%, p<0.001) and slightly older (53.1±16.7 vs 51.0±14.1 years, p=0.012) than participants. The demographic characteristics of the study participants are presented in table 1.


Quitting experiences and preferences for a future quit attempt: a study among inpatient smokers.

Thomas D, Abramson MJ, Bonevski B, Taylor S, Poole SG, Weeks GR, Dooley MJ, George J - BMJ Open (2015)

Diagram outlining patient recruitment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401863&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006959F1: Diagram outlining patient recruitment.
Mentions: The mean participation rate in the RCT was 42.8% across the three sites (participation rates at the individual hospitals ranged from 35.4% to 49.6%) giving a final sample size of 600 participants (figure 1). Non-participants were more likely to be light smokers (72.0% vs 52.7%, p<0.001) and slightly older (53.1±16.7 vs 51.0±14.1 years, p=0.012) than participants. The demographic characteristics of the study participants are presented in table 1.

Bottom Line: Understanding smokers' quit experiences and their preferences for a future quit attempt may aid in the development of effective cessation treatments.The majority of smokers had attempted quitting in the previous 12 months; NRT was a popular cessation treatment, although it was not used as recommended by most.This suggests a need for assistance in the selection and optimal use of cessation aids for hospitalised smokers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Monash University (Parkville Campus), Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus