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Estimating the change in life expectancy after a diagnosis of cancer among the Australian population.

Baade PD, Youlden DR, Andersson TM, Youl PH, Kimlin MG, Aitken JF, Biggar RJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Flexible parametric models were used to estimate loss of life expectancy (LOLE), remaining life expectancy (RLE) and 10-year cumulative probability of cancer-specific death (1-relative survival).In contrast, younger people had lower estimated cumulative probabilities of cancer-specific death within 10 years (40 years: 21.5%, 21.4% to 22.1%) compared with older people (80 years: 55.4%, 55.0% to 55.9%).The LOLE and RLE measures provide complementary messages to standard relative survival estimates (expressed here in terms of cumulative probability of cancer-specific death).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

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Estimates of 10-year cumulative probability of death (1-relative survival) by age at diagnosis and cancer type.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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BMJOPEN2014006740F2: Estimates of 10-year cumulative probability of death (1-relative survival) by age at diagnosis and cancer type.

Mentions: The effect that age had on the 10-year cumulative probability of death varied by cancer type. For all cancers combined, lung cancer, melanoma and, to a lesser extent, stomach cancer, the curve increased with age (table 2 and figure 2). In contrast, breast cancer and prostate cancer showed a U-shaped curve in mortality, while the curve for colorectal cancer was almost flat until it reached the older age groups.


Estimating the change in life expectancy after a diagnosis of cancer among the Australian population.

Baade PD, Youlden DR, Andersson TM, Youl PH, Kimlin MG, Aitken JF, Biggar RJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Estimates of 10-year cumulative probability of death (1-relative survival) by age at diagnosis and cancer type.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401853&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006740F2: Estimates of 10-year cumulative probability of death (1-relative survival) by age at diagnosis and cancer type.
Mentions: The effect that age had on the 10-year cumulative probability of death varied by cancer type. For all cancers combined, lung cancer, melanoma and, to a lesser extent, stomach cancer, the curve increased with age (table 2 and figure 2). In contrast, breast cancer and prostate cancer showed a U-shaped curve in mortality, while the curve for colorectal cancer was almost flat until it reached the older age groups.

Bottom Line: Flexible parametric models were used to estimate loss of life expectancy (LOLE), remaining life expectancy (RLE) and 10-year cumulative probability of cancer-specific death (1-relative survival).In contrast, younger people had lower estimated cumulative probabilities of cancer-specific death within 10 years (40 years: 21.5%, 21.4% to 22.1%) compared with older people (80 years: 55.4%, 55.0% to 55.9%).The LOLE and RLE measures provide complementary messages to standard relative survival estimates (expressed here in terms of cumulative probability of cancer-specific death).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus