Limits...
Estimating the change in life expectancy after a diagnosis of cancer among the Australian population.

Baade PD, Youlden DR, Andersson TM, Youl PH, Kimlin MG, Aitken JF, Biggar RJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Flexible parametric models were used to estimate loss of life expectancy (LOLE), remaining life expectancy (RLE) and 10-year cumulative probability of cancer-specific death (1-relative survival).In contrast, younger people had lower estimated cumulative probabilities of cancer-specific death within 10 years (40 years: 21.5%, 21.4% to 22.1%) compared with older people (80 years: 55.4%, 55.0% to 55.9%).The LOLE and RLE measures provide complementary messages to standard relative survival estimates (expressed here in terms of cumulative probability of cancer-specific death).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Example illustration of relationship between relative survival (calculated as the ratio of B:A at specific points along the curve) and the loss of life expectancy (calculated as the area between the survival curves).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401853&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006740F1: Example illustration of relationship between relative survival (calculated as the ratio of B:A at specific points along the curve) and the loss of life expectancy (calculated as the area between the survival curves).

Mentions: The theoretical concepts of LOLE and RLE are illustrated in figure 1. The RLE for a hypothetical cohort of patients with cancer is represented by the area under the observed survival curve (lower red solid line), with survival time on the x-axis. The area under the expected survival curve (upper green dashed line) represents the life expectancy of the age-sex-year-matched general population. The difference between these two measures, that is, the blue shaded area between the two curves, represents the LOLE from the time of diagnosis onwards.


Estimating the change in life expectancy after a diagnosis of cancer among the Australian population.

Baade PD, Youlden DR, Andersson TM, Youl PH, Kimlin MG, Aitken JF, Biggar RJ - BMJ Open (2015)

Example illustration of relationship between relative survival (calculated as the ratio of B:A at specific points along the curve) and the loss of life expectancy (calculated as the area between the survival curves).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401853&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006740F1: Example illustration of relationship between relative survival (calculated as the ratio of B:A at specific points along the curve) and the loss of life expectancy (calculated as the area between the survival curves).
Mentions: The theoretical concepts of LOLE and RLE are illustrated in figure 1. The RLE for a hypothetical cohort of patients with cancer is represented by the area under the observed survival curve (lower red solid line), with survival time on the x-axis. The area under the expected survival curve (upper green dashed line) represents the life expectancy of the age-sex-year-matched general population. The difference between these two measures, that is, the blue shaded area between the two curves, represents the LOLE from the time of diagnosis onwards.

Bottom Line: Flexible parametric models were used to estimate loss of life expectancy (LOLE), remaining life expectancy (RLE) and 10-year cumulative probability of cancer-specific death (1-relative survival).In contrast, younger people had lower estimated cumulative probabilities of cancer-specific death within 10 years (40 years: 21.5%, 21.4% to 22.1%) compared with older people (80 years: 55.4%, 55.0% to 55.9%).The LOLE and RLE measures provide complementary messages to standard relative survival estimates (expressed here in terms of cumulative probability of cancer-specific death).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus