Limits...
Chronic kidney disease as a risk factor for incident gout among men and women: retrospective cohort study using data from the Framingham Heart Study.

Wang W, Bhole VM, Krishnan E - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Excluding patients who had CKD in the first visit from this study, 2159 men and 2558 women were selected covering a 54-year period (1948-2002).Additional analyses using alternate definitions for CKD and cross-sectional study did not change the results.Sensitivity analysis suggested that the observed findings might be an underestimate of the true relative risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for gout, among participants who had chronic kidney disease (CKD; including CKD present in baseline) and those who never developed CKD in the original Framingham Heart Study cohort.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401834&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006843F2: Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for gout, among participants who had chronic kidney disease (CKD; including CKD present in baseline) and those who never developed CKD in the original Framingham Heart Study cohort.

Mentions: We performed additional analyses to assess the influence of prevalent CKD (combined with incident CKD altogether to be the new main exposure) on gout (the same outcome). For this purpose, we further included 347 participants with prevalent CKD at baseline, who were excluded from the main analyses. In these analyses there were 399 incident cases (249 men and 150 women) of gout and the overall incidence rate of gout was 2.64 (95% CI 2.39 to 2.91) per 1000 person-years. There were 811 individuals (340 men and 471 women) with CKD in general; the incidence rate of gout was 4.26 (95% CI 3.39 to 5.35) per 1000 person-years among those with CKD in general and 2.43 (95% CI 2.18 to 2.71) among those without. The Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for this analysis are shown in figure 2.


Chronic kidney disease as a risk factor for incident gout among men and women: retrospective cohort study using data from the Framingham Heart Study.

Wang W, Bhole VM, Krishnan E - BMJ Open (2015)

Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for gout, among participants who had chronic kidney disease (CKD; including CKD present in baseline) and those who never developed CKD in the original Framingham Heart Study cohort.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401834&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006843F2: Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for gout, among participants who had chronic kidney disease (CKD; including CKD present in baseline) and those who never developed CKD in the original Framingham Heart Study cohort.
Mentions: We performed additional analyses to assess the influence of prevalent CKD (combined with incident CKD altogether to be the new main exposure) on gout (the same outcome). For this purpose, we further included 347 participants with prevalent CKD at baseline, who were excluded from the main analyses. In these analyses there were 399 incident cases (249 men and 150 women) of gout and the overall incidence rate of gout was 2.64 (95% CI 2.39 to 2.91) per 1000 person-years. There were 811 individuals (340 men and 471 women) with CKD in general; the incidence rate of gout was 4.26 (95% CI 3.39 to 5.35) per 1000 person-years among those with CKD in general and 2.43 (95% CI 2.18 to 2.71) among those without. The Kaplan-Meier failure estimates for this analysis are shown in figure 2.

Bottom Line: Excluding patients who had CKD in the first visit from this study, 2159 men and 2558 women were selected covering a 54-year period (1948-2002).Additional analyses using alternate definitions for CKD and cross-sectional study did not change the results.Sensitivity analysis suggested that the observed findings might be an underestimate of the true relative risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus