Limits...
Inhibition ability of food cues between successful and unsuccessful restrained eaters: a two-choice oddball task.

Kong F, Zhang Y, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The current study explores the neural correlations of the specific inhibition ability among successful restrained eaters (S-REs), unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs), and unrestrained eaters (UREs).Results indicate that S-REs showed inhibition deficit in processing high-energy food cues whereas US-REs show inhibition deficit in processing both low- and high-energy food cues.Results indicate that S-REs and US-REs differ in terms of specific inhibition ability and that enhanced inhibition is essential to a successful diet.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Adolescent CyberPsychology and Behavior (Ministry of Education) and School of Psychology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, China; Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have presented mixed findings on the inhibition ability in restrained eaters (REs) due to the limited amount of neural evidence and limitations of behavioral measures. The current study explores the neural correlations of the specific inhibition ability among successful restrained eaters (S-REs), unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs), and unrestrained eaters (UREs).

Methodology and principal findings: Three groups of females (with 13 participants in each group) completed a two-choice Oddball task, while the event-related potentials (ERPs) are recorded synchronously. Results indicate that S-REs showed inhibition deficit in processing high-energy food cues whereas US-REs show inhibition deficit in processing both low- and high-energy food cues.

Conclusion: Results indicate that S-REs and US-REs differ in terms of specific inhibition ability and that enhanced inhibition is essential to a successful diet.

Show MeSH
Grand average waveform of the stimulus-locked ERPs for P2, N2 and P3 at Fz, Cz and Pz in S-RE (a), US-RE (b) and URE(c).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401785&req=5

pone.0120522.g001: Grand average waveform of the stimulus-locked ERPs for P2, N2 and P3 at Fz, Cz and Pz in S-RE (a), US-RE (b) and URE(c).

Mentions: Results of repeated measures ANOVA of 3 (picture: High-energy food pictures, low-energy food pictures, neutral pictures)×3(group: S-REs, US-REs, UREs) ×4 (cortex: Frontal F3, F4, Fz; frontal-central FC3, FC4, FCz; central C3, C4, Cz; central-parietal CP3, CP4, CPz) on P2 amplitude showed main effects of picture (F(1.089, 42.486) = 7.531, p =. 007) and cortex (F(1.580, 61.616) = 7.220, p =. 003). The post-hoc test showed high-energy and low energy food pictures elicited smaller P2 amplitude compared to the neutral pictures (t(38) = 4.358, p =. 001; t(38) = 3.203, p =. 035), and high-energy food pictures were not significantly different from low-energy food pictures on the P2 amplitude. Post-hoc test on the cortex showed that P2 amplitude in the frontal cortex were larger than the central cortex (t(37) = 2.853, p =. 041), P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than the central and parietal cortex (t(37) = 4.132, p =. 001; t(37) = 3, p =. 028). Moreover, interaction of picture and cortex was also significant (F(2.363,92.145) = 61.452, p =. 001)(Fig 1 and Table 3). Simple effect analysis showed for the high-energy food pictures, P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than in frontal, central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 11.284, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 8.120, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 11.942, p =. 001). For the low-energy food pictures, P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than in frontal-central, central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 8.777, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 11.497, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 2.863, p =. 007). For the neutral pictures, P2 was larger in the central cortex than the frontal, frontal-central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 4.824, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 9.412, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 8.192, p =. 001).


Inhibition ability of food cues between successful and unsuccessful restrained eaters: a two-choice oddball task.

Kong F, Zhang Y, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Grand average waveform of the stimulus-locked ERPs for P2, N2 and P3 at Fz, Cz and Pz in S-RE (a), US-RE (b) and URE(c).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401785&req=5

pone.0120522.g001: Grand average waveform of the stimulus-locked ERPs for P2, N2 and P3 at Fz, Cz and Pz in S-RE (a), US-RE (b) and URE(c).
Mentions: Results of repeated measures ANOVA of 3 (picture: High-energy food pictures, low-energy food pictures, neutral pictures)×3(group: S-REs, US-REs, UREs) ×4 (cortex: Frontal F3, F4, Fz; frontal-central FC3, FC4, FCz; central C3, C4, Cz; central-parietal CP3, CP4, CPz) on P2 amplitude showed main effects of picture (F(1.089, 42.486) = 7.531, p =. 007) and cortex (F(1.580, 61.616) = 7.220, p =. 003). The post-hoc test showed high-energy and low energy food pictures elicited smaller P2 amplitude compared to the neutral pictures (t(38) = 4.358, p =. 001; t(38) = 3.203, p =. 035), and high-energy food pictures were not significantly different from low-energy food pictures on the P2 amplitude. Post-hoc test on the cortex showed that P2 amplitude in the frontal cortex were larger than the central cortex (t(37) = 2.853, p =. 041), P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than the central and parietal cortex (t(37) = 4.132, p =. 001; t(37) = 3, p =. 028). Moreover, interaction of picture and cortex was also significant (F(2.363,92.145) = 61.452, p =. 001)(Fig 1 and Table 3). Simple effect analysis showed for the high-energy food pictures, P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than in frontal, central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 11.284, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 8.120, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 11.942, p =. 001). For the low-energy food pictures, P2 amplitude in the frontal-central cortex was larger than in frontal-central, central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 8.777, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 11.497, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 2.863, p =. 007). For the neutral pictures, P2 was larger in the central cortex than the frontal, frontal-central and central-parietal cortex (F(3,37) = 4.824, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 9.412, p =. 001; F(3,37) = 8.192, p =. 001).

Bottom Line: The current study explores the neural correlations of the specific inhibition ability among successful restrained eaters (S-REs), unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs), and unrestrained eaters (UREs).Results indicate that S-REs showed inhibition deficit in processing high-energy food cues whereas US-REs show inhibition deficit in processing both low- and high-energy food cues.Results indicate that S-REs and US-REs differ in terms of specific inhibition ability and that enhanced inhibition is essential to a successful diet.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Adolescent CyberPsychology and Behavior (Ministry of Education) and School of Psychology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, China; Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education) and Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have presented mixed findings on the inhibition ability in restrained eaters (REs) due to the limited amount of neural evidence and limitations of behavioral measures. The current study explores the neural correlations of the specific inhibition ability among successful restrained eaters (S-REs), unsuccessful restrained eaters (US-REs), and unrestrained eaters (UREs).

Methodology and principal findings: Three groups of females (with 13 participants in each group) completed a two-choice Oddball task, while the event-related potentials (ERPs) are recorded synchronously. Results indicate that S-REs showed inhibition deficit in processing high-energy food cues whereas US-REs show inhibition deficit in processing both low- and high-energy food cues.

Conclusion: Results indicate that S-REs and US-REs differ in terms of specific inhibition ability and that enhanced inhibition is essential to a successful diet.

Show MeSH