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The role of principal and secondary diagnoses of hospitalized eye trauma: a nationwide cohort in Taiwan, 1996-2010.

Lee JS, Chiou MJ, Teng FL, See LC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The sex risk ratio was 3.1 for a principal diagnosis and 2.1 for a secondary diagnosis.The main causes of eye trauma were traffic accident, work accident, assault (among males <60 years of age), and falls (among elderly men and women).The proportion admitted to an ophthalmic department among those with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma (64.8%) was significantly higher than among those with a secondary diagnosis (2.3%) (p<.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To estimate the rate of hospitalized eye trauma in Taiwan and investigate the role between principal and secondary diagnoses of such trauma.

Methods: Nationwide fixed cohort study of 1,000,000 beneficiaries from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Database was used and 4819 patients who were hospitalized for eye trauma during 1996-2010 were analyzed.

Results: During 1996-2010, the incidence rates of hospitalized eye trauma (per 100 000 person-years) were 35.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 34.0 to 36.0) for total diagnosis, 9.8 (95% CI, 9.3 to 10.3) for a principal diagnosis, and 25.3 (95% CI, 24.4 to 26.1) for a secondary diagnosis. The sex risk ratio was 3.1 for a principal diagnosis and 2.1 for a secondary diagnosis. The main causes of eye trauma were traffic accident, work accident, assault (among males <60 years of age), and falls (among elderly men and women). The proportion admitted to an ophthalmic department among those with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma (64.8%) was significantly higher than among those with a secondary diagnosis (2.3%) (p<.0001). Patients with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma had shorter hospital stays (7.1±10.2 days) and lower fatality (0.07%) than those with a secondary diagnosis of eye trauma (10.0±31.6 days and 0.3%, respectively).

Conclusion: Data only from ophthalmic admissions tends to underestimate the true incidence rate of hospitalized eye trauma. Patients with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma had less severe injuries than did those with a secondary diagnosis.

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Age-specific incidence rate (per 100 000 person-years) of hospitalized eye trauma as a principal diagnosis (a) and secondary diagnosis (b) by sex, Taiwan (1996–2010), and error bar indicated 95% confidence interval.
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pone.0123348.g001: Age-specific incidence rate (per 100 000 person-years) of hospitalized eye trauma as a principal diagnosis (a) and secondary diagnosis (b) by sex, Taiwan (1996–2010), and error bar indicated 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: Age-specific incidence rates of two diagnoses substantially differed between males and females (Fig 1A and 1B). For principal diagnoses, the rate among males rose from age 0–29 years, plateaued until age 70–79 years, and dropped after age 80 years. Among females, the rate gradually rose and reached a local peak at age 30–39 years and another peak at age 70–79 years. The highest sex RRs were 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–7.1) at age 40–49 years, and the lowest sex RR were 0.8 (95% CI 0.4–1.4) at age ≥80 years. For secondary diagnoses, both males and females had peaks (per 100 000 person-years) at age 20–29 years and 60–69 years. The highest sex RRs were 2.7 (95% CI, 2.3–3.2) at age 20–29, and the lowest sex RR were 1.4 (95% CI, 0.9–2.1) at age ≥80 years.


The role of principal and secondary diagnoses of hospitalized eye trauma: a nationwide cohort in Taiwan, 1996-2010.

Lee JS, Chiou MJ, Teng FL, See LC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Age-specific incidence rate (per 100 000 person-years) of hospitalized eye trauma as a principal diagnosis (a) and secondary diagnosis (b) by sex, Taiwan (1996–2010), and error bar indicated 95% confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401784&req=5

pone.0123348.g001: Age-specific incidence rate (per 100 000 person-years) of hospitalized eye trauma as a principal diagnosis (a) and secondary diagnosis (b) by sex, Taiwan (1996–2010), and error bar indicated 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: Age-specific incidence rates of two diagnoses substantially differed between males and females (Fig 1A and 1B). For principal diagnoses, the rate among males rose from age 0–29 years, plateaued until age 70–79 years, and dropped after age 80 years. Among females, the rate gradually rose and reached a local peak at age 30–39 years and another peak at age 70–79 years. The highest sex RRs were 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–7.1) at age 40–49 years, and the lowest sex RR were 0.8 (95% CI 0.4–1.4) at age ≥80 years. For secondary diagnoses, both males and females had peaks (per 100 000 person-years) at age 20–29 years and 60–69 years. The highest sex RRs were 2.7 (95% CI, 2.3–3.2) at age 20–29, and the lowest sex RR were 1.4 (95% CI, 0.9–2.1) at age ≥80 years.

Bottom Line: The sex risk ratio was 3.1 for a principal diagnosis and 2.1 for a secondary diagnosis.The main causes of eye trauma were traffic accident, work accident, assault (among males <60 years of age), and falls (among elderly men and women).The proportion admitted to an ophthalmic department among those with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma (64.8%) was significantly higher than among those with a secondary diagnosis (2.3%) (p<.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital & Chang Gung University, Taoyuan City, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To estimate the rate of hospitalized eye trauma in Taiwan and investigate the role between principal and secondary diagnoses of such trauma.

Methods: Nationwide fixed cohort study of 1,000,000 beneficiaries from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Database was used and 4819 patients who were hospitalized for eye trauma during 1996-2010 were analyzed.

Results: During 1996-2010, the incidence rates of hospitalized eye trauma (per 100 000 person-years) were 35.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 34.0 to 36.0) for total diagnosis, 9.8 (95% CI, 9.3 to 10.3) for a principal diagnosis, and 25.3 (95% CI, 24.4 to 26.1) for a secondary diagnosis. The sex risk ratio was 3.1 for a principal diagnosis and 2.1 for a secondary diagnosis. The main causes of eye trauma were traffic accident, work accident, assault (among males <60 years of age), and falls (among elderly men and women). The proportion admitted to an ophthalmic department among those with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma (64.8%) was significantly higher than among those with a secondary diagnosis (2.3%) (p<.0001). Patients with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma had shorter hospital stays (7.1±10.2 days) and lower fatality (0.07%) than those with a secondary diagnosis of eye trauma (10.0±31.6 days and 0.3%, respectively).

Conclusion: Data only from ophthalmic admissions tends to underestimate the true incidence rate of hospitalized eye trauma. Patients with a principal diagnosis of eye trauma had less severe injuries than did those with a secondary diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus