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QTL mapping of agronomic waterlogging tolerance using recombinant inbred lines derived from tropical maize (Zea mays L) germplasm.

Zaidi PH, Rashid Z, Vinayan MT, Almeida GD, Phagna RK, Babu R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns.Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species.A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)-Asia, C/o International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, Hyderabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns. The most economic option to offset the damage caused by waterlogging is to genetically incorporate tolerance in cultivars that are grown widely in the target agro-ecologies. We assessed the genetic variation in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from crossing a waterlogging tolerant line (CAWL-46-3-1) to an elite but sensitive line (CML311-2-1-3) and observed significant range of variation for grain yield (GY) under waterlogging stress along with a number of other secondary traits such as brace roots (BR), chlorophyll content (SPAD), % stem and root lodging (S&RL) among the RILs. Significant positive correlation of GY with BR and SPAD and negative correlation with S&RL indicated the potential use of these secondary traits in selection indices under waterlogged conditions. RILs were genotyped with 331 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers using KASP (Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR) Platform. QTL mapping revealed five QTL on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10, which together explained approximately 30% of phenotypic variance for GY based on evaluation of RIL families under waterlogged conditions, with effects ranging from 520 to 640 kg/ha for individual genomic regions. 13 QTL were identified for various secondary traits associated with waterlogging tolerance, each individually explaining from 3 to 14% of phenotypic variance. Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species. A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Linkage groups along with QTL identified for traits associated with waterlogging tolerance using RIL and TC phenotypes (R_: Identified using RIL dataset, T_: Identified using TC data set, Traits: GY—Grain yield, RL—Root lodging, SL—Stem lodging, BR—Brace roots, M—Plant Mortality %, CC—Chlorophyll content, ASI—Anthesis-Silking interval).
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pone.0124350.g001: Linkage groups along with QTL identified for traits associated with waterlogging tolerance using RIL and TC phenotypes (R_: Identified using RIL dataset, T_: Identified using TC data set, Traits: GY—Grain yield, RL—Root lodging, SL—Stem lodging, BR—Brace roots, M—Plant Mortality %, CC—Chlorophyll content, ASI—Anthesis-Silking interval).

Mentions: The RIL evaluations revealed five QTL for GY under waterlogging stress on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 and one QTL on chromosome 5 using RIL TC dataset (Tables 2 and 3, Fig 1). The position of the QTL identified in the RIL-TC experiment on chromosome 5 was close to that of GY in RIL and accounted for 3.4 and 8% of the phenotypic variance respectively. The trait enhancing alleles in both the cases were contributed by the water logging tolerant parent line. The five QTL detected in RIL experiment together explained close to 30% of the phenotypic variance. The favorable alleles at QTL on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 were contributed by the waterlogging tolerant parent, while the susceptible parent donated the favorable alleles at the rest of the two loci. The additive effects of the QTL from water logging tolerant parental line were significant and substantial which ranged from 520 to 640 Kg/ha). Interestingly, the favorable allele at QTL on chromosome 7 was contributed by the waterlogging susceptible parent (CML311), which had an additive effect of around 500 Kg/ha.


QTL mapping of agronomic waterlogging tolerance using recombinant inbred lines derived from tropical maize (Zea mays L) germplasm.

Zaidi PH, Rashid Z, Vinayan MT, Almeida GD, Phagna RK, Babu R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Linkage groups along with QTL identified for traits associated with waterlogging tolerance using RIL and TC phenotypes (R_: Identified using RIL dataset, T_: Identified using TC data set, Traits: GY—Grain yield, RL—Root lodging, SL—Stem lodging, BR—Brace roots, M—Plant Mortality %, CC—Chlorophyll content, ASI—Anthesis-Silking interval).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401703&req=5

pone.0124350.g001: Linkage groups along with QTL identified for traits associated with waterlogging tolerance using RIL and TC phenotypes (R_: Identified using RIL dataset, T_: Identified using TC data set, Traits: GY—Grain yield, RL—Root lodging, SL—Stem lodging, BR—Brace roots, M—Plant Mortality %, CC—Chlorophyll content, ASI—Anthesis-Silking interval).
Mentions: The RIL evaluations revealed five QTL for GY under waterlogging stress on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 and one QTL on chromosome 5 using RIL TC dataset (Tables 2 and 3, Fig 1). The position of the QTL identified in the RIL-TC experiment on chromosome 5 was close to that of GY in RIL and accounted for 3.4 and 8% of the phenotypic variance respectively. The trait enhancing alleles in both the cases were contributed by the water logging tolerant parent line. The five QTL detected in RIL experiment together explained close to 30% of the phenotypic variance. The favorable alleles at QTL on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 were contributed by the waterlogging tolerant parent, while the susceptible parent donated the favorable alleles at the rest of the two loci. The additive effects of the QTL from water logging tolerant parental line were significant and substantial which ranged from 520 to 640 Kg/ha). Interestingly, the favorable allele at QTL on chromosome 7 was contributed by the waterlogging susceptible parent (CML311), which had an additive effect of around 500 Kg/ha.

Bottom Line: Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns.Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species.A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)-Asia, C/o International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, Hyderabad, India.

ABSTRACT
Waterlogging is an important abiotic stress constraint that causes significant yield losses in maize grown throughout south and south-east Asia due to erratic rainfall patterns. The most economic option to offset the damage caused by waterlogging is to genetically incorporate tolerance in cultivars that are grown widely in the target agro-ecologies. We assessed the genetic variation in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from crossing a waterlogging tolerant line (CAWL-46-3-1) to an elite but sensitive line (CML311-2-1-3) and observed significant range of variation for grain yield (GY) under waterlogging stress along with a number of other secondary traits such as brace roots (BR), chlorophyll content (SPAD), % stem and root lodging (S&RL) among the RILs. Significant positive correlation of GY with BR and SPAD and negative correlation with S&RL indicated the potential use of these secondary traits in selection indices under waterlogged conditions. RILs were genotyped with 331 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers using KASP (Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR) Platform. QTL mapping revealed five QTL on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10, which together explained approximately 30% of phenotypic variance for GY based on evaluation of RIL families under waterlogged conditions, with effects ranging from 520 to 640 kg/ha for individual genomic regions. 13 QTL were identified for various secondary traits associated with waterlogging tolerance, each individually explaining from 3 to 14% of phenotypic variance. Of the 22 candidate genes with known functional domains identified within the physical intervals delimited by the flanking markers of the QTL influencing GY and other secondary traits, six have previously been demonstrated to be associated with anaerobic responses in either maize or other model species. A pair of flanking SNP markers has been identified for each of the QTL and high throughput marker assays were developed to facilitate rapid introgression of waterlogging tolerance in tropical maize breeding programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus