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Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

Vieira AR, Gibson CW, Deeley K, Xue H, Li Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind.Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors.Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean enamel microhardness of 5-month old mice developed with variable amounts of amelogenin.Knockout mice (KO B6, KO C3H N5, KO Mix), which express no Amelx have “softer” enamel in comparison to the other strains (ANOVA; p<0.0001).
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pone.0124236.g002: Mean enamel microhardness of 5-month old mice developed with variable amounts of amelogenin.Knockout mice (KO B6, KO C3H N5, KO Mix), which express no Amelx have “softer” enamel in comparison to the other strains (ANOVA; p<0.0001).

Mentions: We tested the samples from males and females at baseline and after exposure to an artificial caries protocol with the goal of defining if samples from strains with different levels of Amelx protein are differently influenced by high caries challenge conditions [32–35]. Enamel microhardness results showed that low AMELX levels led to weaker enamel (Fig 2, ANOVA; p < 0.0001).


Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

Vieira AR, Gibson CW, Deeley K, Xue H, Li Y - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean enamel microhardness of 5-month old mice developed with variable amounts of amelogenin.Knockout mice (KO B6, KO C3H N5, KO Mix), which express no Amelx have “softer” enamel in comparison to the other strains (ANOVA; p<0.0001).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401694&req=5

pone.0124236.g002: Mean enamel microhardness of 5-month old mice developed with variable amounts of amelogenin.Knockout mice (KO B6, KO C3H N5, KO Mix), which express no Amelx have “softer” enamel in comparison to the other strains (ANOVA; p<0.0001).
Mentions: We tested the samples from males and females at baseline and after exposure to an artificial caries protocol with the goal of defining if samples from strains with different levels of Amelx protein are differently influenced by high caries challenge conditions [32–35]. Enamel microhardness results showed that low AMELX levels led to weaker enamel (Fig 2, ANOVA; p < 0.0001).

Bottom Line: Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind.Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors.Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus