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Dynamic causal modelling for functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

Tak S, Kempny AM, Friston KJ, Leff AP, Penny WD - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: Specifically, we present a generative model of how observed fNIRS data are caused by interactions among hidden neuronal states.Inversion of this generative model, using an established Bayesian framework (variational Laplace), then enables inference about changes in directed connectivity at the neuronal level.Using experimental data acquired during motor imagery and motor execution tasks, we show that directed (i.e., effective) connectivity from the supplementary motor area to the primary motor cortex is negatively modulated by motor imagery, and this suppressive influence causes reduced activity in the primary motor cortex during motor imagery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: s.tak@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Estimated neural responses (z). During motor imagery, neural activity in primary motor cortex (M1) is significantly reduced, while neural activity in supplementary motor area (SMA) is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. The solid black line indicates the task period (5 s).
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f0045: Estimated neural responses (z). During motor imagery, neural activity in primary motor cortex (M1) is significantly reduced, while neural activity in supplementary motor area (SMA) is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. The solid black line indicates the task period (5 s).

Mentions: Estimated neural responses shown in Fig. 9 show that during motor imagery, neural activity in M1 is significantly reduced, while neural activity in SMA is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. These results correspond to the findings of previous fMRI studies which have shown that M1 is more active during motor execution, while lateral SMA is more involved in motor imagery (Kasess et al., 2008; Gerardin et al., 2000).


Dynamic causal modelling for functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

Tak S, Kempny AM, Friston KJ, Leff AP, Penny WD - Neuroimage (2015)

Estimated neural responses (z). During motor imagery, neural activity in primary motor cortex (M1) is significantly reduced, while neural activity in supplementary motor area (SMA) is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. The solid black line indicates the task period (5 s).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401444&req=5

f0045: Estimated neural responses (z). During motor imagery, neural activity in primary motor cortex (M1) is significantly reduced, while neural activity in supplementary motor area (SMA) is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. The solid black line indicates the task period (5 s).
Mentions: Estimated neural responses shown in Fig. 9 show that during motor imagery, neural activity in M1 is significantly reduced, while neural activity in SMA is relatively consistent, compared with activity during motor execution. These results correspond to the findings of previous fMRI studies which have shown that M1 is more active during motor execution, while lateral SMA is more involved in motor imagery (Kasess et al., 2008; Gerardin et al., 2000).

Bottom Line: Specifically, we present a generative model of how observed fNIRS data are caused by interactions among hidden neuronal states.Inversion of this generative model, using an established Bayesian framework (variational Laplace), then enables inference about changes in directed connectivity at the neuronal level.Using experimental data acquired during motor imagery and motor execution tasks, we show that directed (i.e., effective) connectivity from the supplementary motor area to the primary motor cortex is negatively modulated by motor imagery, and this suppressive influence causes reduced activity in the primary motor cortex during motor imagery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: s.tak@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.