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Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies.

Wagstyl K, Ronan L, Goodyer IM, Fletcher PC - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex.We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure-function relationships.The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK. Electronic address: kw350@cam.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Human functional hierarchy. Cortical thickness (mm) increases with fMRI-derived functional hierarchical level (Grill-Spector and Malach, 2004) in humans (See Table 1 for statistical results). Points represent mean thickness value for a random sample region across 83 subjects; error bars represent population standard deviation. Lines show linear model with grey 95% confidence band for population trend. Solid lines and filled circles show left hemisphere, dashed lines and hollow circles show right hemisphere.
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f0040: Human functional hierarchy. Cortical thickness (mm) increases with fMRI-derived functional hierarchical level (Grill-Spector and Malach, 2004) in humans (See Table 1 for statistical results). Points represent mean thickness value for a random sample region across 83 subjects; error bars represent population standard deviation. Lines show linear model with grey 95% confidence band for population trend. Solid lines and filled circles show left hemisphere, dashed lines and hollow circles show right hemisphere.


Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies.

Wagstyl K, Ronan L, Goodyer IM, Fletcher PC - Neuroimage (2015)

Human functional hierarchy. Cortical thickness (mm) increases with fMRI-derived functional hierarchical level (Grill-Spector and Malach, 2004) in humans (See Table 1 for statistical results). Points represent mean thickness value for a random sample region across 83 subjects; error bars represent population standard deviation. Lines show linear model with grey 95% confidence band for population trend. Solid lines and filled circles show left hemisphere, dashed lines and hollow circles show right hemisphere.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401442&req=5

f0040: Human functional hierarchy. Cortical thickness (mm) increases with fMRI-derived functional hierarchical level (Grill-Spector and Malach, 2004) in humans (See Table 1 for statistical results). Points represent mean thickness value for a random sample region across 83 subjects; error bars represent population standard deviation. Lines show linear model with grey 95% confidence band for population trend. Solid lines and filled circles show left hemisphere, dashed lines and hollow circles show right hemisphere.
Bottom Line: Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex.We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure-function relationships.The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK. Electronic address: kw350@cam.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus