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Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies.

Wagstyl K, Ronan L, Goodyer IM, Fletcher PC - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex.We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure-function relationships.The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK. Electronic address: kw350@cam.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of folding on cortical thickness. (a) The red line shows a sample path across the cortical surface. Gyri are visibly thicker than their adjacent sulci. (b) Unsmoothed MRI thickness values across one cortical hemisphere. Gyri are significantly thicker than sulci in a two-sample T-test (p < 0.001). (c) Hypothesised effect of folding on thickness values obscuring gradient. (d) Actual data taken from a sample path proceeding anteriorly from V1 in one subject. Averaging across 10 random surface parcellations mitigates the effect of gyral–sulcal position.
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f0020: The effect of folding on cortical thickness. (a) The red line shows a sample path across the cortical surface. Gyri are visibly thicker than their adjacent sulci. (b) Unsmoothed MRI thickness values across one cortical hemisphere. Gyri are significantly thicker than sulci in a two-sample T-test (p < 0.001). (c) Hypothesised effect of folding on thickness values obscuring gradient. (d) Actual data taken from a sample path proceeding anteriorly from V1 in one subject. Averaging across 10 random surface parcellations mitigates the effect of gyral–sulcal position.

Mentions: However, empirical evidence that cortical thickness is a marker of structural hierarchy is lacking. A relationship between the thickness of a cortical area and its relative hierarchical position may be obscured by the mechanics of cortical gyrification, which cause gyri to be on average 20% thicker than sulci (Van Essen and Maunsell, 1980; Fischl and Dale, 2000). However, these effects, although relatively under-explored, can easily be identified and accounted for using MR-based surface reconstruction approaches (Fig. 3).


Cortical thickness gradients in structural hierarchies.

Wagstyl K, Ronan L, Goodyer IM, Fletcher PC - Neuroimage (2015)

The effect of folding on cortical thickness. (a) The red line shows a sample path across the cortical surface. Gyri are visibly thicker than their adjacent sulci. (b) Unsmoothed MRI thickness values across one cortical hemisphere. Gyri are significantly thicker than sulci in a two-sample T-test (p < 0.001). (c) Hypothesised effect of folding on thickness values obscuring gradient. (d) Actual data taken from a sample path proceeding anteriorly from V1 in one subject. Averaging across 10 random surface parcellations mitigates the effect of gyral–sulcal position.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401442&req=5

f0020: The effect of folding on cortical thickness. (a) The red line shows a sample path across the cortical surface. Gyri are visibly thicker than their adjacent sulci. (b) Unsmoothed MRI thickness values across one cortical hemisphere. Gyri are significantly thicker than sulci in a two-sample T-test (p < 0.001). (c) Hypothesised effect of folding on thickness values obscuring gradient. (d) Actual data taken from a sample path proceeding anteriorly from V1 in one subject. Averaging across 10 random surface parcellations mitigates the effect of gyral–sulcal position.
Mentions: However, empirical evidence that cortical thickness is a marker of structural hierarchy is lacking. A relationship between the thickness of a cortical area and its relative hierarchical position may be obscured by the mechanics of cortical gyrification, which cause gyri to be on average 20% thicker than sulci (Van Essen and Maunsell, 1980; Fischl and Dale, 2000). However, these effects, although relatively under-explored, can easily be identified and accounted for using MR-based surface reconstruction approaches (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Our results suggest that an easily measurable macroscopic brain parameter, namely, cortical thickness, is systematically related to cytoarchitecture and to the structural hierarchical organisation of the cortex.We argue that the measurement of cortical thickness gradients may become an important way to develop our understanding of brain structure-function relationships.The identification of alterations in such gradients may complement the observation of regionally localised cortical thickness changes in our understanding of normal development and neuropsychiatric illnesses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EB, UK. Electronic address: kw350@cam.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus