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A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activity profiles of the motor and premotor areas in left (a) and right (b) hemisphere of the monkey: F1, F2, F3, F4, F5c, F5p, F5a, F6 and F7 obtained in Experiment 2 (group of 3 monkeys). Activity is expressed in % of average activity, but very similar results were obtained using the actual values expressed in % of fixation (see Material and methods). Same color code as in Fig. 5. Insets (left) indicate locations of areas (taken from Rizzolatti and Luppino, 2001; Rizzolatti and Sinigaglia, 2010). Vertical bars indicate SE (over 18 runs). The main effect of action reached significance (corrected for multiple comparisons 2 × 9) in F5a bilaterally (left: t = 4.14, p < 0.0005 and right t = 3.16, p < 0.02), but not in left F5c (t = 2.73, p > 0.05). The interaction proved significant only in left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation was significantly larger than the response to any of the three other conditions (all t > 4.1, p < 0.0005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation also differed significantly from fixation baseline (t = 4.07, p < 0.0005). Note that the absence of activation for person grasping in F5p and F1 is consistent with recent reports (Kraskov et al., 2009; Vigneswaran et al., 2013) indicating that in these areas about equal proportions of neurons are activated and suppressed by observing grasping.
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f0030: Activity profiles of the motor and premotor areas in left (a) and right (b) hemisphere of the monkey: F1, F2, F3, F4, F5c, F5p, F5a, F6 and F7 obtained in Experiment 2 (group of 3 monkeys). Activity is expressed in % of average activity, but very similar results were obtained using the actual values expressed in % of fixation (see Material and methods). Same color code as in Fig. 5. Insets (left) indicate locations of areas (taken from Rizzolatti and Luppino, 2001; Rizzolatti and Sinigaglia, 2010). Vertical bars indicate SE (over 18 runs). The main effect of action reached significance (corrected for multiple comparisons 2 × 9) in F5a bilaterally (left: t = 4.14, p < 0.0005 and right t = 3.16, p < 0.02), but not in left F5c (t = 2.73, p > 0.05). The interaction proved significant only in left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation was significantly larger than the response to any of the three other conditions (all t > 4.1, p < 0.0005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation also differed significantly from fixation baseline (t = 4.07, p < 0.0005). Note that the absence of activation for person grasping in F5p and F1 is consistent with recent reports (Kraskov et al., 2009; Vigneswaran et al., 2013) indicating that in these areas about equal proportions of neurons are activated and suppressed by observing grasping.

Mentions: Experiment 2 was carried out in three monkeys using these new stimuli. The results are summarized by the group activity profiles of all monkey motor cortical areas, plotting the % MR signal change relative to the average activity in the run, in the four experimental conditions (Fig. 6). T tests revealed significant interaction between person and action in a single area: left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005 corrected for number of ROIs). This interaction was significant in each of the three monkey subjects (t = 2.3, 2.8, and 2.74 in subjects 1, 2 and 3 with p < 0.01, p < 0.003 and p < 0.004 respectively). Given the location of the fixation point (Fig. 1e, red dot), this left lateralization might suggest that monkey F5c becomes active during observation of the hand-shaping phase of grasping, before the hand contacts the object, i.e., when the hand is in the right visual hemifield. Indeed, even if we consider the size of the fixation window, sensitivity to the actual grasping (hand on object) should yield a right-sided or bilateral activation. The left F5c profile indicates that its activation by the acting person exceeded that of all three other conditions, with the main effect of action being non-significant (for statistics, see legend in Fig. 6). Contrasting the acting person and fixation conditions confirmed that the acting person evoked a significant visual response in left F5c. In contrast to the interaction, the action main effect reached significance in the F5a ROIs bilaterally (see legend in Fig. 6).


A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Activity profiles of the motor and premotor areas in left (a) and right (b) hemisphere of the monkey: F1, F2, F3, F4, F5c, F5p, F5a, F6 and F7 obtained in Experiment 2 (group of 3 monkeys). Activity is expressed in % of average activity, but very similar results were obtained using the actual values expressed in % of fixation (see Material and methods). Same color code as in Fig. 5. Insets (left) indicate locations of areas (taken from Rizzolatti and Luppino, 2001; Rizzolatti and Sinigaglia, 2010). Vertical bars indicate SE (over 18 runs). The main effect of action reached significance (corrected for multiple comparisons 2 × 9) in F5a bilaterally (left: t = 4.14, p < 0.0005 and right t = 3.16, p < 0.02), but not in left F5c (t = 2.73, p > 0.05). The interaction proved significant only in left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation was significantly larger than the response to any of the three other conditions (all t > 4.1, p < 0.0005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation also differed significantly from fixation baseline (t = 4.07, p < 0.0005). Note that the absence of activation for person grasping in F5p and F1 is consistent with recent reports (Kraskov et al., 2009; Vigneswaran et al., 2013) indicating that in these areas about equal proportions of neurons are activated and suppressed by observing grasping.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401441&req=5

f0030: Activity profiles of the motor and premotor areas in left (a) and right (b) hemisphere of the monkey: F1, F2, F3, F4, F5c, F5p, F5a, F6 and F7 obtained in Experiment 2 (group of 3 monkeys). Activity is expressed in % of average activity, but very similar results were obtained using the actual values expressed in % of fixation (see Material and methods). Same color code as in Fig. 5. Insets (left) indicate locations of areas (taken from Rizzolatti and Luppino, 2001; Rizzolatti and Sinigaglia, 2010). Vertical bars indicate SE (over 18 runs). The main effect of action reached significance (corrected for multiple comparisons 2 × 9) in F5a bilaterally (left: t = 4.14, p < 0.0005 and right t = 3.16, p < 0.02), but not in left F5c (t = 2.73, p > 0.05). The interaction proved significant only in left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation was significantly larger than the response to any of the three other conditions (all t > 4.1, p < 0.0005). The response of left F5c to the person acting observation also differed significantly from fixation baseline (t = 4.07, p < 0.0005). Note that the absence of activation for person grasping in F5p and F1 is consistent with recent reports (Kraskov et al., 2009; Vigneswaran et al., 2013) indicating that in these areas about equal proportions of neurons are activated and suppressed by observing grasping.
Mentions: Experiment 2 was carried out in three monkeys using these new stimuli. The results are summarized by the group activity profiles of all monkey motor cortical areas, plotting the % MR signal change relative to the average activity in the run, in the four experimental conditions (Fig. 6). T tests revealed significant interaction between person and action in a single area: left F5c (t = 3.61, p < 0.005 corrected for number of ROIs). This interaction was significant in each of the three monkey subjects (t = 2.3, 2.8, and 2.74 in subjects 1, 2 and 3 with p < 0.01, p < 0.003 and p < 0.004 respectively). Given the location of the fixation point (Fig. 1e, red dot), this left lateralization might suggest that monkey F5c becomes active during observation of the hand-shaping phase of grasping, before the hand contacts the object, i.e., when the hand is in the right visual hemifield. Indeed, even if we consider the size of the fixation window, sensitivity to the actual grasping (hand on object) should yield a right-sided or bilateral activation. The left F5c profile indicates that its activation by the acting person exceeded that of all three other conditions, with the main effect of action being non-significant (for statistics, see legend in Fig. 6). Contrasting the acting person and fixation conditions confirmed that the acting person evoked a significant visual response in left F5c. In contrast to the interaction, the action main effect reached significance in the F5a ROIs bilaterally (see legend in Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus