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A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Activity profiles of left and right phF5c obtained in Experiment 1 (a) and Experiment 3 (b). Blue bars: observing person acting and controls; green bars: observing hand grasping and controls. Vertical bars: SE across subjects. In a: only right phF5c is shown: 75 voxels defined by the whole brain interaction, in b left and right phF5c: 29 and 109 voxels defined by whole brain interaction. In a observing acting person was significantly different (correcting for 3 comparisons) from 3 controls (paired t tests all t > 3.8, p < 0.002) but observing grasping hand was not (all t < 2.05, p > 0.06); in b: for statistics see Table 1. Activity profiles were obtained with SPM 8. Similar results were obtained for the right PCSi interaction region (a) when analyzed with SPM 2: see Fig. S1.
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f0025: Activity profiles of left and right phF5c obtained in Experiment 1 (a) and Experiment 3 (b). Blue bars: observing person acting and controls; green bars: observing hand grasping and controls. Vertical bars: SE across subjects. In a: only right phF5c is shown: 75 voxels defined by the whole brain interaction, in b left and right phF5c: 29 and 109 voxels defined by whole brain interaction. In a observing acting person was significantly different (correcting for 3 comparisons) from 3 controls (paired t tests all t > 3.8, p < 0.002) but observing grasping hand was not (all t < 2.05, p > 0.06); in b: for statistics see Table 1. Activity profiles were obtained with SPM 8. Similar results were obtained for the right PCSi interaction region (a) when analyzed with SPM 2: see Fig. S1.

Mentions: The activity profile for the interaction site (75 voxels, Fig. 5a; see also Fig. S2) plotting the % MR signal change, relative to fixation baseline, in the four conditions pertaining to the acting person (blue bars) and the grasping hand (green bars) closely corresponds to that of monkey F5c (Nelissen et al., 2005). This indicates that the interaction reflects a robust response to observing the acting person rather than a strong static hand control response, as expected from the masking procedure (see Material and methods).


A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Activity profiles of left and right phF5c obtained in Experiment 1 (a) and Experiment 3 (b). Blue bars: observing person acting and controls; green bars: observing hand grasping and controls. Vertical bars: SE across subjects. In a: only right phF5c is shown: 75 voxels defined by the whole brain interaction, in b left and right phF5c: 29 and 109 voxels defined by whole brain interaction. In a observing acting person was significantly different (correcting for 3 comparisons) from 3 controls (paired t tests all t > 3.8, p < 0.002) but observing grasping hand was not (all t < 2.05, p > 0.06); in b: for statistics see Table 1. Activity profiles were obtained with SPM 8. Similar results were obtained for the right PCSi interaction region (a) when analyzed with SPM 2: see Fig. S1.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401441&req=5

f0025: Activity profiles of left and right phF5c obtained in Experiment 1 (a) and Experiment 3 (b). Blue bars: observing person acting and controls; green bars: observing hand grasping and controls. Vertical bars: SE across subjects. In a: only right phF5c is shown: 75 voxels defined by the whole brain interaction, in b left and right phF5c: 29 and 109 voxels defined by whole brain interaction. In a observing acting person was significantly different (correcting for 3 comparisons) from 3 controls (paired t tests all t > 3.8, p < 0.002) but observing grasping hand was not (all t < 2.05, p > 0.06); in b: for statistics see Table 1. Activity profiles were obtained with SPM 8. Similar results were obtained for the right PCSi interaction region (a) when analyzed with SPM 2: see Fig. S1.
Mentions: The activity profile for the interaction site (75 voxels, Fig. 5a; see also Fig. S2) plotting the % MR signal change, relative to fixation baseline, in the four conditions pertaining to the acting person (blue bars) and the grasping hand (green bars) closely corresponds to that of monkey F5c (Nelissen et al., 2005). This indicates that the interaction reflects a robust response to observing the acting person rather than a strong static hand control response, as expected from the masking procedure (see Material and methods).

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.