Limits...
A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical parametric maps (SPMs) showing in color the voxels activated in the subtraction acting person vs controls (a, d) grasping hand vs controls (b, e) and the interaction i.e., the difference between the previous subtractions (c, f) obtained in Experiment 1 (a–c) and Experiment 3 (d–f) rendered on the lateral view of right frontal cortex. Thresholds: p < 0.001 uncorrected in a–c and f and p < 0.01 uncorrected in d, e. Top color scale applies to a–c, the lower left to d–e and that on lower right to f. Green arrows indicate central sulcus. The weaker activation in d, e likely reflects the lower frame rate in Experiment 3 relative to 1 (see Fig. 8).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401441&req=5

f0015: Statistical parametric maps (SPMs) showing in color the voxels activated in the subtraction acting person vs controls (a, d) grasping hand vs controls (b, e) and the interaction i.e., the difference between the previous subtractions (c, f) obtained in Experiment 1 (a–c) and Experiment 3 (d–f) rendered on the lateral view of right frontal cortex. Thresholds: p < 0.001 uncorrected in a–c and f and p < 0.01 uncorrected in d, e. Top color scale applies to a–c, the lower left to d–e and that on lower right to f. Green arrows indicate central sulcus. The weaker activation in d, e likely reflects the lower frame rate in Experiment 3 relative to 1 (see Fig. 8).

Mentions: In Experiment 1 volunteers viewed the following visual stimuli: grasping hand, acting person, static frames taken from the middle and the end of the action videos, and scrambled action stimuli, the same as those used by Nelissen et al. (2005). Contrasting observation of the acting person with its three controls (Fig. 3a) yielded activation in the right precentral sulcus (PCS) and adjoining precentral gyrus (PCG). This activation extended medio-laterally from the junction of PCS with the superior frontal sulcus (SFS) to that with the inferior frontal sulcus (IFS). The same contrast for the grasping hand revealed a similar precentral activation (Fig. 3b) but with a central gap. At this position (40, − 4, 44) the interaction (Fig. 3c) tested at the random-effects level proved significant (t = 4.81, p < 0.001 unc). While this activation did not reach FWE corrected significance at the single voxel level (p < 0.345), it did reach this threshold at the cluster level (p < 0.03).


A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Statistical parametric maps (SPMs) showing in color the voxels activated in the subtraction acting person vs controls (a, d) grasping hand vs controls (b, e) and the interaction i.e., the difference between the previous subtractions (c, f) obtained in Experiment 1 (a–c) and Experiment 3 (d–f) rendered on the lateral view of right frontal cortex. Thresholds: p < 0.001 uncorrected in a–c and f and p < 0.01 uncorrected in d, e. Top color scale applies to a–c, the lower left to d–e and that on lower right to f. Green arrows indicate central sulcus. The weaker activation in d, e likely reflects the lower frame rate in Experiment 3 relative to 1 (see Fig. 8).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401441&req=5

f0015: Statistical parametric maps (SPMs) showing in color the voxels activated in the subtraction acting person vs controls (a, d) grasping hand vs controls (b, e) and the interaction i.e., the difference between the previous subtractions (c, f) obtained in Experiment 1 (a–c) and Experiment 3 (d–f) rendered on the lateral view of right frontal cortex. Thresholds: p < 0.001 uncorrected in a–c and f and p < 0.01 uncorrected in d, e. Top color scale applies to a–c, the lower left to d–e and that on lower right to f. Green arrows indicate central sulcus. The weaker activation in d, e likely reflects the lower frame rate in Experiment 3 relative to 1 (see Fig. 8).
Mentions: In Experiment 1 volunteers viewed the following visual stimuli: grasping hand, acting person, static frames taken from the middle and the end of the action videos, and scrambled action stimuli, the same as those used by Nelissen et al. (2005). Contrasting observation of the acting person with its three controls (Fig. 3a) yielded activation in the right precentral sulcus (PCS) and adjoining precentral gyrus (PCG). This activation extended medio-laterally from the junction of PCS with the superior frontal sulcus (SFS) to that with the inferior frontal sulcus (IFS). The same contrast for the grasping hand revealed a similar precentral activation (Fig. 3b) but with a central gap. At this position (40, − 4, 44) the interaction (Fig. 3c) tested at the random-effects level proved significant (t = 4.81, p < 0.001 unc). While this activation did not reach FWE corrected significance at the single voxel level (p < 0.345), it did reach this threshold at the cluster level (p < 0.03).

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus