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A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Factorial design (a) and the two types of action video in old (b, c) and new (d, e) action videos: acting person (b, d) and grasping hand (c, e). Static frames of the four videos are shown: frames near the middle of the video in a, c, and multiple frames showing the pre-shaping of the hand in d, e. Sizes were 18 × 20° in b, 13 × 16° in c, and 10 × 10° in d, e. The colored dots in d indicate the positions of the fixation point (red in the actual experiments) relative to the target object: red dot: Experiment 2: (monkey); right green dot: Experiments 1 & S1, both green dots: Experiments 3–4 and part of Experiment S3, yellow dot: Experiment S2. In a the factorial design shown is for the new stimuli; for the old stimuli several control conditions were used: 3 in Experiment 1 and 2 in Experiment S1 (Table 1). For calculation of the interaction the different controls were averaged, so that in practice the design remained 2 × 2.
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f0005: Factorial design (a) and the two types of action video in old (b, c) and new (d, e) action videos: acting person (b, d) and grasping hand (c, e). Static frames of the four videos are shown: frames near the middle of the video in a, c, and multiple frames showing the pre-shaping of the hand in d, e. Sizes were 18 × 20° in b, 13 × 16° in c, and 10 × 10° in d, e. The colored dots in d indicate the positions of the fixation point (red in the actual experiments) relative to the target object: red dot: Experiment 2: (monkey); right green dot: Experiments 1 & S1, both green dots: Experiments 3–4 and part of Experiment S3, yellow dot: Experiment S2. In a the factorial design shown is for the new stimuli; for the old stimuli several control conditions were used: 3 in Experiment 1 and 2 in Experiment S1 (Table 1). For calculation of the interaction the different controls were averaged, so that in practice the design remained 2 × 2.

Mentions: All video clips show human actors performing grasping. The study of Nelissen et al. (2005) has shown that these evoke strong MR responses in monkey premotor cortex. Furthermore, Jastorff et al. (2012b) explicitly compared video clips portraying monkey and human full-body actions such as running or climbing, and found little advantage to using monkey actions in investigating monkey STS (see their Fig. 8). Electrophysiological studies of premotor cortex (Rizzolatti et al., 1996a; Caggiano et al., 2014) also support the view that both human and monkey actions drive premotor mirror neurons with only a slight advantage for monkey actions, although a detailed quantitative comparison is still lacking. The experiments followed a factorial 2 × 2 design with person (present, absent) and action (present, absent) as factors (Fig. 1a), and used either ‘old’ (Experiments 1, S1) or ‘new’ stimuli (Experiments 2–4, S1, S2, S3). They all included a fixation baseline condition (fixation point on empty screen).


A human homologue of monkey F5c.

Ferri S, Peeters R, Nelissen K, Vanduffel W, Rizzolatti G, Orban GA - Neuroimage (2015)

Factorial design (a) and the two types of action video in old (b, c) and new (d, e) action videos: acting person (b, d) and grasping hand (c, e). Static frames of the four videos are shown: frames near the middle of the video in a, c, and multiple frames showing the pre-shaping of the hand in d, e. Sizes were 18 × 20° in b, 13 × 16° in c, and 10 × 10° in d, e. The colored dots in d indicate the positions of the fixation point (red in the actual experiments) relative to the target object: red dot: Experiment 2: (monkey); right green dot: Experiments 1 & S1, both green dots: Experiments 3–4 and part of Experiment S3, yellow dot: Experiment S2. In a the factorial design shown is for the new stimuli; for the old stimuli several control conditions were used: 3 in Experiment 1 and 2 in Experiment S1 (Table 1). For calculation of the interaction the different controls were averaged, so that in practice the design remained 2 × 2.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401441&req=5

f0005: Factorial design (a) and the two types of action video in old (b, c) and new (d, e) action videos: acting person (b, d) and grasping hand (c, e). Static frames of the four videos are shown: frames near the middle of the video in a, c, and multiple frames showing the pre-shaping of the hand in d, e. Sizes were 18 × 20° in b, 13 × 16° in c, and 10 × 10° in d, e. The colored dots in d indicate the positions of the fixation point (red in the actual experiments) relative to the target object: red dot: Experiment 2: (monkey); right green dot: Experiments 1 & S1, both green dots: Experiments 3–4 and part of Experiment S3, yellow dot: Experiment S2. In a the factorial design shown is for the new stimuli; for the old stimuli several control conditions were used: 3 in Experiment 1 and 2 in Experiment S1 (Table 1). For calculation of the interaction the different controls were averaged, so that in practice the design remained 2 × 2.
Mentions: All video clips show human actors performing grasping. The study of Nelissen et al. (2005) has shown that these evoke strong MR responses in monkey premotor cortex. Furthermore, Jastorff et al. (2012b) explicitly compared video clips portraying monkey and human full-body actions such as running or climbing, and found little advantage to using monkey actions in investigating monkey STS (see their Fig. 8). Electrophysiological studies of premotor cortex (Rizzolatti et al., 1996a; Caggiano et al., 2014) also support the view that both human and monkey actions drive premotor mirror neurons with only a slight advantage for monkey actions, although a detailed quantitative comparison is still lacking. The experiments followed a factorial 2 × 2 design with person (present, absent) and action (present, absent) as factors (Fig. 1a), and used either ‘old’ (Experiments 1, S1) or ‘new’ stimuli (Experiments 2–4, S1, S2, S3). They all included a fixation baseline condition (fixation point on empty screen).

Bottom Line: By presenting the two grasping actions (actor, hand) and varying the low level visual characteristics, we localized a putative human homologue of area F5c (phF5c) in the inferior part of precentral sulcus, bilaterally.In contrast to monkey F5c, phF5c is asymmetric, with a right-sided bias, and is activated more strongly during the observation of the later stages of grasping when the hand is close to the object.The latter characteristic might be related to the emergence, in humans, of the capacity to precisely copy motor acts performed by others, and thus imitation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus