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EPA Method 1615. Measurement of enterovirus and norovirus occurrence in water by culture and RT-qPCR. I. Collection of virus samples.

Fout GS, Cashdollar JL, Varughese EA, Parshionikar SU, Grimm AC - J Vis Exp (2015)

Bottom Line: Studies using two different, but equivalent, cartridge filter options showed that filter clogging was a problem with 10% of the samples with one of the filter types compared to 6% with the other filter type.Clogging tends to increase with turbidity, but cannot be predicted based on turbidity measurements only.From a cost standpoint one of the filter options is preferable over the other, but the water quality and experience with the water system to be sampled should be taken into consideration in making filter selections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S Environmental Protection Agency; fout.shay@epa.gov.

ABSTRACT
EPA Method 1615 was developed with a goal of providing a standard method for measuring enteroviruses and noroviruses in environmental and drinking waters. The standardized sampling component of the method concentrates viruses that may be present in water by passage of a minimum specified volume of water through an electropositive cartridge filter. The minimum specified volumes for surface and finished/ground water are 300 L and 1,500 L, respectively. A major method limitation is the tendency for the filters to clog before meeting the sample volume requirement. Studies using two different, but equivalent, cartridge filter options showed that filter clogging was a problem with 10% of the samples with one of the filter types compared to 6% with the other filter type. Clogging tends to increase with turbidity, but cannot be predicted based on turbidity measurements only. From a cost standpoint one of the filter options is preferable over the other, but the water quality and experience with the water system to be sampled should be taken into consideration in making filter selections.

No MeSH data available.


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EPA Method 1615. Measurement of enterovirus and norovirus occurrence in water by culture and RT-qPCR. I. Collection of virus samples.

Fout GS, Cashdollar JL, Varughese EA, Parshionikar SU, Grimm AC - J Vis Exp (2015)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401389&req=5

Bottom Line: Studies using two different, but equivalent, cartridge filter options showed that filter clogging was a problem with 10% of the samples with one of the filter types compared to 6% with the other filter type.Clogging tends to increase with turbidity, but cannot be predicted based on turbidity measurements only.From a cost standpoint one of the filter options is preferable over the other, but the water quality and experience with the water system to be sampled should be taken into consideration in making filter selections.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S Environmental Protection Agency; fout.shay@epa.gov.

ABSTRACT
EPA Method 1615 was developed with a goal of providing a standard method for measuring enteroviruses and noroviruses in environmental and drinking waters. The standardized sampling component of the method concentrates viruses that may be present in water by passage of a minimum specified volume of water through an electropositive cartridge filter. The minimum specified volumes for surface and finished/ground water are 300 L and 1,500 L, respectively. A major method limitation is the tendency for the filters to clog before meeting the sample volume requirement. Studies using two different, but equivalent, cartridge filter options showed that filter clogging was a problem with 10% of the samples with one of the filter types compared to 6% with the other filter type. Clogging tends to increase with turbidity, but cannot be predicted based on turbidity measurements only. From a cost standpoint one of the filter options is preferable over the other, but the water quality and experience with the water system to be sampled should be taken into consideration in making filter selections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus