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Standardised packaging and new enlarged graphic health warnings for tobacco products in Australia — legislative requirements and implementation of the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act 2011 and the Competition and Consumer (Tobacco) Information Standard , 2011

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the development, content and implementation of two pieces of Australian tobacco control legislation: one to standardise the packaging of tobacco products and the other to introduce new, enlarged graphic health warnings. It describes the process of legislative drafting, public consultation and parliamentary consideration. It summarises exactly how tobacco products have been required to look since late 2012. Finally, it describes implementation, most particularly, the extent to which packs compliant with the legislation became available to consumers over time.

No MeSH data available.


Adjusted proportion of respondents with packs purchased in Australia which were self-reported as plain and with Set 2 warnings on their current cigarette pack. Notes: Transition to plain packs: Cigarette smokers (total n=8679; analysed and plotted n=7659). We excluded n=49 who currently smoked unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco and n=234 who did not report their current brand name and thus did not get asked the plain packaging question. We also excluded those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=74), or did not know where the pack was purchased (n=305), in order to limit the analysis to packs purchased in Australia. Finally, it excludes those who were not using their original pack (n=24) or who refused or responded not applicable or did not know (n=162), and those with missing demographic information (n=172). Rollout of Set 2 warnings: Cigarette smokers who had their current pack of cigarettes/tobacco with them (total n=1726; analysed and plotted n=1553). We excluded n=13 who currently smoke unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco, and thus did not get asked to identify their pack's health warning, those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=8), did not know where the pack was purchased (n=23), who reported a non-Australian or no health warning (n=52), those who refused or did not know (n=21), and with missing demographic information (n=56).
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TOBACCOCONTROL2014052073F5: Adjusted proportion of respondents with packs purchased in Australia which were self-reported as plain and with Set 2 warnings on their current cigarette pack. Notes: Transition to plain packs: Cigarette smokers (total n=8679; analysed and plotted n=7659). We excluded n=49 who currently smoked unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco and n=234 who did not report their current brand name and thus did not get asked the plain packaging question. We also excluded those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=74), or did not know where the pack was purchased (n=305), in order to limit the analysis to packs purchased in Australia. Finally, it excludes those who were not using their original pack (n=24) or who refused or responded not applicable or did not know (n=162), and those with missing demographic information (n=172). Rollout of Set 2 warnings: Cigarette smokers who had their current pack of cigarettes/tobacco with them (total n=1726; analysed and plotted n=1553). We excluded n=13 who currently smoke unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco, and thus did not get asked to identify their pack's health warning, those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=8), did not know where the pack was purchased (n=23), who reported a non-Australian or no health warning (n=52), those who refused or did not know (n=21), and with missing demographic information (n=56).

Mentions: Figure 5 shows the adjusted proportion of current tobacco packages (including cigarette packs and RYO pouches) purchased in Australia which were self-reported by cigarette smokers to be plain, by month. On average, 5.1% of packs were reported to be plain between April and September 2012. There was a rapid increase in the percentage of packs reported to be plain between October and December 2012, with 14.3% reported as plain in October, 57.8% in November and 94.5% in December. From January 2013, 95.1% of packs were reported as plain.


Standardised packaging and new enlarged graphic health warnings for tobacco products in Australia — legislative requirements and implementation of the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act 2011 and the Competition and Consumer (Tobacco) Information Standard , 2011
Adjusted proportion of respondents with packs purchased in Australia which were self-reported as plain and with Set 2 warnings on their current cigarette pack. Notes: Transition to plain packs: Cigarette smokers (total n=8679; analysed and plotted n=7659). We excluded n=49 who currently smoked unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco and n=234 who did not report their current brand name and thus did not get asked the plain packaging question. We also excluded those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=74), or did not know where the pack was purchased (n=305), in order to limit the analysis to packs purchased in Australia. Finally, it excludes those who were not using their original pack (n=24) or who refused or responded not applicable or did not know (n=162), and those with missing demographic information (n=172). Rollout of Set 2 warnings: Cigarette smokers who had their current pack of cigarettes/tobacco with them (total n=1726; analysed and plotted n=1553). We excluded n=13 who currently smoke unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco, and thus did not get asked to identify their pack's health warning, those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=8), did not know where the pack was purchased (n=23), who reported a non-Australian or no health warning (n=52), those who refused or did not know (n=21), and with missing demographic information (n=56).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401341&req=5

TOBACCOCONTROL2014052073F5: Adjusted proportion of respondents with packs purchased in Australia which were self-reported as plain and with Set 2 warnings on their current cigarette pack. Notes: Transition to plain packs: Cigarette smokers (total n=8679; analysed and plotted n=7659). We excluded n=49 who currently smoked unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco and n=234 who did not report their current brand name and thus did not get asked the plain packaging question. We also excluded those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=74), or did not know where the pack was purchased (n=305), in order to limit the analysis to packs purchased in Australia. Finally, it excludes those who were not using their original pack (n=24) or who refused or responded not applicable or did not know (n=162), and those with missing demographic information (n=172). Rollout of Set 2 warnings: Cigarette smokers who had their current pack of cigarettes/tobacco with them (total n=1726; analysed and plotted n=1553). We excluded n=13 who currently smoke unbranded ‘chop-chop’ tobacco, and thus did not get asked to identify their pack's health warning, those who purchased duty free or overseas (n=8), did not know where the pack was purchased (n=23), who reported a non-Australian or no health warning (n=52), those who refused or did not know (n=21), and with missing demographic information (n=56).
Mentions: Figure 5 shows the adjusted proportion of current tobacco packages (including cigarette packs and RYO pouches) purchased in Australia which were self-reported by cigarette smokers to be plain, by month. On average, 5.1% of packs were reported to be plain between April and September 2012. There was a rapid increase in the percentage of packs reported to be plain between October and December 2012, with 14.3% reported as plain in October, 57.8% in November and 94.5% in December. From January 2013, 95.1% of packs were reported as plain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This paper describes the development, content and implementation of two pieces of Australian tobacco control legislation: one to standardise the packaging of tobacco products and the other to introduce new, enlarged graphic health warnings. It describes the process of legislative drafting, public consultation and parliamentary consideration. It summarises exactly how tobacco products have been required to look since late 2012. Finally, it describes implementation, most particularly, the extent to which packs compliant with the legislation became available to consumers over time.

No MeSH data available.