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Early indications that low mental quality of life scores in recently unwell older people predict downstream functional decline.

Atlas A, Grimmer K, Kennedy K - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Bottom Line: MCS at 1 month (MCS1) post ED discharge was significantly associated with instrumental activities of daily living at 1 (r=0.45, P<0.001) and 3 months (r=0.401, P=0.001) post ED discharge, but not at baseline (r=0.010, P>0.05).There were no significant confounders.Low MCS scores 1 month after a minor health crisis appear to significantly predict downstream FD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Accurately detecting markers of early functional decline (FD) are essential to support older people to successfully age in place; however, these markers are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that compromised mental quality of life after a minor health crisis could be an early predictor of FD.

Methods: This longitudinal observational cohort study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a large Australian hospital and in the community. Data were collected from 148 community-dwelling people aged 65+ years, who provided data at recruitment (baseline), and at 1 month and 3 months post discharge from the ED. Short Form-12 mental quality of life component scores (MCS) were regressed with patient descriptors taken at baseline (age, sex, socioeconomic status, education, Mini-Mental State Examination, and primary language), and over-time estimates of FD taken at baseline, and at 1 and 3 months post discharge (instrumental activities of daily living, frequency of falls and hospitalizations, use of gait aids, receipt of community services, living status, and requiring a carer).

Results: MCS at 1 month (MCS1) post ED discharge was significantly associated with instrumental activities of daily living at 1 (r=0.45, P<0.001) and 3 months (r=0.401, P=0.001) post ED discharge, but not at baseline (r=0.010, P>0.05). Subjects with lower than the population median MCS showed a significant linear decline in total instrumental activities of daily living scores over 3 months (P=0.025). There was no linear trend over time in the relationship between MCS1 with frequency of falls (P=0.20) or hospitalizations (P=0.42); however, there was a significant difference at 3 months post ED discharge for falls (P=0.036) and hospitalizations (P=0.039) between low and high MCS1 groups. There were no significant confounders.

Conclusion: Low MCS scores 1 month after a minor health crisis appear to significantly predict downstream FD. This finding needs to be tested in a larger sample.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Total IADL scores, percentage of falls, and percentage of hospitalizations over time (baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge) stratified by MCS1.Abbreviations: ED, emergency department; IADL, instrumental activities of daily living; MCS, mental quality of life component score; MCS1, mental quality of life component score at 1 month.
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f3-cia-10-703: Total IADL scores, percentage of falls, and percentage of hospitalizations over time (baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge) stratified by MCS1.Abbreviations: ED, emergency department; IADL, instrumental activities of daily living; MCS, mental quality of life component score; MCS1, mental quality of life component score at 1 month.

Mentions: Figure 3 reports over-time trends of total IADL scores and the percentages of falls and hospital admissions. There is a significant decreasing linear trend regarding total IADL scores for the low MCS group (P=0.025), which highlights the potential impact of quality of life on activities of daily living. For the group with above median mental quality of life, there was no significant linear trend (P=0.388). Further analysis showed that there was no significant difference among the IADL means of the high MCS group at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge (P=0.156). However, a significant difference was identified between the means of the low MCS group taken at the three time points (P=0.021).


Early indications that low mental quality of life scores in recently unwell older people predict downstream functional decline.

Atlas A, Grimmer K, Kennedy K - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Total IADL scores, percentage of falls, and percentage of hospitalizations over time (baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge) stratified by MCS1.Abbreviations: ED, emergency department; IADL, instrumental activities of daily living; MCS, mental quality of life component score; MCS1, mental quality of life component score at 1 month.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4401334&req=5

f3-cia-10-703: Total IADL scores, percentage of falls, and percentage of hospitalizations over time (baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge) stratified by MCS1.Abbreviations: ED, emergency department; IADL, instrumental activities of daily living; MCS, mental quality of life component score; MCS1, mental quality of life component score at 1 month.
Mentions: Figure 3 reports over-time trends of total IADL scores and the percentages of falls and hospital admissions. There is a significant decreasing linear trend regarding total IADL scores for the low MCS group (P=0.025), which highlights the potential impact of quality of life on activities of daily living. For the group with above median mental quality of life, there was no significant linear trend (P=0.388). Further analysis showed that there was no significant difference among the IADL means of the high MCS group at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months post ED discharge (P=0.156). However, a significant difference was identified between the means of the low MCS group taken at the three time points (P=0.021).

Bottom Line: MCS at 1 month (MCS1) post ED discharge was significantly associated with instrumental activities of daily living at 1 (r=0.45, P<0.001) and 3 months (r=0.401, P=0.001) post ED discharge, but not at baseline (r=0.010, P>0.05).There were no significant confounders.Low MCS scores 1 month after a minor health crisis appear to significantly predict downstream FD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Accurately detecting markers of early functional decline (FD) are essential to support older people to successfully age in place; however, these markers are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that compromised mental quality of life after a minor health crisis could be an early predictor of FD.

Methods: This longitudinal observational cohort study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a large Australian hospital and in the community. Data were collected from 148 community-dwelling people aged 65+ years, who provided data at recruitment (baseline), and at 1 month and 3 months post discharge from the ED. Short Form-12 mental quality of life component scores (MCS) were regressed with patient descriptors taken at baseline (age, sex, socioeconomic status, education, Mini-Mental State Examination, and primary language), and over-time estimates of FD taken at baseline, and at 1 and 3 months post discharge (instrumental activities of daily living, frequency of falls and hospitalizations, use of gait aids, receipt of community services, living status, and requiring a carer).

Results: MCS at 1 month (MCS1) post ED discharge was significantly associated with instrumental activities of daily living at 1 (r=0.45, P<0.001) and 3 months (r=0.401, P=0.001) post ED discharge, but not at baseline (r=0.010, P>0.05). Subjects with lower than the population median MCS showed a significant linear decline in total instrumental activities of daily living scores over 3 months (P=0.025). There was no linear trend over time in the relationship between MCS1 with frequency of falls (P=0.20) or hospitalizations (P=0.42); however, there was a significant difference at 3 months post ED discharge for falls (P=0.036) and hospitalizations (P=0.039) between low and high MCS1 groups. There were no significant confounders.

Conclusion: Low MCS scores 1 month after a minor health crisis appear to significantly predict downstream FD. This finding needs to be tested in a larger sample.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus